Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Indeterminacy with no-income-effect preferences and sector-specific externalities

Contents:

Author Info

  • Guo, Jang-Ting
  • Harrison, Sharon G.

Abstract

We examine a two-sector real business cycle (RBC) model with sector-specific externalities in which household utility exhibits no income effect on the demand for leisure. Unlike in the one-sector counterpart, indeterminacy can result with sufficiently high returns-to-scale in the investment sector. Moreover, the smaller the labor supply elasticity, the lower the level of externalities needed for indeterminacy. This finding is the opposite of that in all existing RBC-based indeterminacy studies. Finally, in contrast to previous sunspot-driven two-sector RBC models, our economy is able to match the stylized facts that sectoral labor inputs are positively correlated and consumption is procyclical.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WJ3-4X4RWWM-3/2/24a8b22e10f65ada341c35d183adab9e
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Theory.

Volume (Year): 145 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 287-300

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:145:y:2010:i:1:p:287-300

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622869

Related research

Keywords: Indeterminacy Income effect Sector-specific externalities;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Marco Maffezzoli, 1998. "Online Appendix to Human Capital and International Real Business Cycles," Technical Appendices maffezzoli00, Review of Economic Dynamics.
  2. Basu, Susanto & Fernald, John G, 1997. "Returns to Scale in U.S. Production: Estimates and Implications," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(2), pages 249-83, April.
  3. Benhabib Jess & Farmer Roger E. A., 1994. "Indeterminacy and Increasing Returns," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 19-41, June.
  4. Jess Benhabib & Richard Rogerson & Randall Wright, 1991. "Homework in macroeconomics: household production and aggregate fluctuations," Staff Report 135, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  5. Benhabib, Jess & Nishimura, Kazuo, 1998. "Indeterminacy and Sunspots with Constant Returns," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 58-96, July.
  6. Roberto Perli, . "Indeterminacy, Home Production, and the Business Cycle: a Calibrated Analysis," CARESS Working Papres 97-4, University of Pennsylvania Center for Analytic Research and Economics in the Social Sciences.
  7. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
  8. Shea, John, 1993. "Do Supply Curves Slope Up?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(1), pages 1-32, February.
  9. Richard Blundell & Thomas MaCurdy, 1998. "Labour supply: a review of alternative approaches," IFS Working Papers W98/18, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  10. Jess Benhabib & Qinglai Meng & Kazuo Nishimura, 2000. "Indeterminacy under Constant Returns to Scale in Multisector Economies," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(6), pages 1541-1548, November.
  11. Roger E.A. Farmer & Jang Ting Guo, 1992. "Real Business Cycles and the Animal Spirits Hypothesis," UCLA Economics Working Papers 680, UCLA Department of Economics.
  12. Merz, Monika, 1995. "Search in the labor market and the real business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 269-300, November.
  13. Harrison, Sharon G., 2001. "Indeterminacy in a model with sector-specific externalities," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 747-764, May.
  14. Andolfatto, David, 1996. "Business Cycles and Labor-Market Search," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(1), pages 112-32, March.
  15. Meng, Qinglai & Yip, Chong Kee, 2008. "On indeterminacy in one-sector models of the business cycle with factor-generated externalities," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 97-110, March.
  16. Benhabib, Jess & Farmer, Roger E A, 1996. "Indeterminacy and Sector-specific Externalities," CEPR Discussion Papers 1403, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  17. Nir Jaimovich, 2005. "Income Effects and Indeterminacy in a Calibrated One-Sector Growth Model," Discussion Papers 07-012, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, revised Mar 2007.
  18. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi & Huffman, Gregory W, 1988. "Investment, Capacity Utilization, and the Real Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(3), pages 402-17, June.
  19. Perli, Roberto & Sakellaris, Plutarchos, 1998. "Human capital formation and business cycle persistence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 67-92, June.
  20. Benhabib, Jess & Farmer, Roger E.A., 1999. "Indeterminacy and sunspots in macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 6, pages 387-448 Elsevier.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Nishimura, Kazuo & Venditti, Alain, 2010. "Indeterminacy and expectation-driven fluctuations with non-separable preferences," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 46-56, July.
  2. Juin-Jen Chang & Jang-Ting Guo & Jhy-Yuan Shieh & Wei-Neng Wang, 2013. "Sectoral Composition of Government Spending and Macroeconomic (In)stability," IEAS Working Paper : academic research 13-A010, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
  3. Magris, Francesco, 2012. "Indeterminacy and multiple steady states with sector-specific externalities," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2664-2672.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:145:y:2010:i:1:p:287-300. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.