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Crime, weather, and climate change

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  • Ranson, Matthew

Abstract

This paper estimates the impact of climate change on the prevalence of criminal activity in the United States. The analysis is based on a 30-year panel of monthly crime and weather data for 2997 US counties. I identify the effect of weather on monthly crime by using a semi-parametric bin estimator and controlling for state-by-month and county-by-year fixed effects. The results show that temperature has a strong positive effect on criminal behavior, with little evidence of lagged impacts. Between 2010 and 2099, climate change will cause an additional 22,000 murders, 180,000 cases of rape, 1.2 million aggravated assaults, 2.3 million simple assaults, 260,000 robberies, 1.3 million burglaries, 2.2 million cases of larceny, and 580,000 cases of vehicle theft in the United States.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Environmental Economics and Management.

Volume (Year): 67 (2014)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 274-302

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeeman:v:67:y:2014:i:3:p:274-302

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622870

Related research

Keywords: Climate change; Crime; Weather;

References

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