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Pro-environmental behaviors for thee but not for me: Green giants, green Gods, and external environmental locus of control

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  • Kalamas, Maria
  • Cleveland, Mark
  • Laroche, Michel
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    Abstract

    Understanding consumers' allocation of environmental responsibility to external forces (i.e., those perceived to be beyond their direct control) is important yet under-researched. This paper examines how these external attributions affect consumers' pro-environmental behaviors (PEBs). A model of external environmental locus of control (i.e., external-ELOC) is tested, consisting of two superordinate dimensions: powerful-others (encapsulating corporate and government responsibility facets) and chance/fate (incorporating God/higher-power and natural earth-cycle facets). The two higher-order factors negatively associate; such that consumers ascribing environmental responsibility to powerful-others engage in PEBs; whereas those attributing environmental change to chance/fate typically do not. The results inform practical and public policy implications; pinpointing ways for corporations and governments to target their pro-environmental efforts and to sway consumers who share in the ecological burden.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Business Research.

    Volume (Year): 67 (2014)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 12-22

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:67:y:2014:i:2:p:12-22

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jbusres

    Related research

    Keywords: External environmental locus of control; Pro-environmental behaviors; Green marketing; Structural equation modeling; Attitude–behavior relationship;

    References

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    Cited by:
    1. Engelland, Brian T., 2014. "Religion, humanism, marketing, and the consumption of socially responsible products, services, and ideas: Introduction to a special topic section," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 1-4.

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