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Horizontal inequities in Australia's mixed public/private health care system

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  • Van Doorslaer, Eddy
  • Clarke, Philip
  • Savage, Elizabeth
  • Hall, Jane

Abstract

Recent comparative evidence from OECD countries suggests that Australia's mixed public-private health system does a good job in ensuring high and fairly equal access to doctor, hospital and dental care services. This paper provides some further analysis of the same data from the Australian National Health Survey for 2001 to examine whether the general finding of horizontal equity remains when the full potential of the data is realized. We extend the common core cross-country comparative analysis by expanding the set of indicators used in the procedure of standardizing for health care need differences, by providing a separate analysis for the use for general practitioner and specialist care and by differentiating between admissions as public and private patients. Overall, our analysis confirms that in 2001 Medicare largely did seem to be attaining an equitable distribution of health care access: Australians in need of care did get to see a doctor and to be admitted to a hospital. However, they were not equally likely to see the same doctor and to end up in the same hospital bed. As in other OECD countries, higher income Australians are more likely to consult a specialist, all else equal, while lower income patients are more likely to consult a general practitioner. The unequal distribution of private health insurance coverage by income contributes to the phenomenon that the better-off and the less well-off do not receive the same mix of services. There is a risk that - as in some other OECD countries - the principle of equal access for equal need may be further compromised by the future expansion of the private sector in secondary care services. To the extent that such inequalities in use may translate in inequalities in health outcomes, there may be some reason for concern.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Health Policy.

Volume (Year): 86 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 (April)
Pages: 97-108

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Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:86:y:2008:i:1:p:97-108

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/healthpol

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References

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  1. Elizabeth Savage & Glenn Jones, 2004. "An Analysis of the General Practice Access Scheme on GP Incomes, Bulk Billing and Consumer Copayments," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 37(1), pages 31-40, 03.
  2. van Doorslaer, Eddy & Wagstaff, Adam & van der Burg, Hattem & Christiansen, Terkel & De Graeve, Diana & Duchesne, Inge & Gerdtham, Ulf-G & Gerfin, Michael & Geurts, Jose & Gross, Lorna, 2000. "Equity in the delivery of health care in Europe and the US," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 553-583, September.
  3. Denise Doiron & Glenn Jones & Elizabeth Savage, 2008. "Healthy, wealthy and insured? The role of self-assessed health in the demand for private health insurance," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(3), pages 317-334.
  4. Kees van Gool & Elizabeth Savage & Rosalie Viney & Marion Haas & Rob Anderson, 2009. "Who's Getting Caught? An Analysis of the Australian Medicare Safety Net," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(2), pages 143-154.
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As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Who reaps the benefits? Rethinking the Medicare Safety Net
    by Kees Van Gool, Health economist at University of Technology, Sydney in The Conversation on 2012-02-01 19:30:54
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Cited by:
  1. Søgaard, Rikke & Pedersen, Morten Saaby & Bech, Mickael, 2013. "To what extent does employer-paid health insurance reduce the use of public hospitals?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(1), pages 61-68.
  2. Mohammad Hajizadeh & M. Karen Campbell & Sisira Sarma, 2014. "Socioeconomic inequalities in adult obesity risk in Canada: trends and decomposition analyses," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 203-221, March.
  3. Kees van Gool & Elizabeth Savage & Rosalie Viney & Marion Haas & Rob Anderson, 2009. "Who's Getting Caught? An Analysis of the Australian Medicare Safety Net," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(2), pages 143-154.
  4. Mohammad Hajizadeh & Luke B. Connelly & James R.G. Butler & Aredshir Khosravi, 2012. "Unmet need and met unneed in health care utilisation in Iran," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 39(6), pages 400-422, May.
  5. Ma, Chao & Gu, Hai & Li, Jiajia, 2012. "我国医疗保健的城乡分割问题研究
    [Urban-Rural Disparities in Health Care]
    ," MPRA Paper 47655, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Layte, Richard & Nolan, Anne, 2013. "Income-Related Inequity in the Use of GP Services: A Comparison of Ireland and Scotland," Papers WP454, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  7. E. Xie, 2011. "Income-related inequalities of health and health care utilization," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 131-156, March.
  8. Edel Doherty & Anne Dee & Ciaran O’Neill, 2012. "Estimating the Amount of Overweight and Obesity Related Health-Care Use in the Republic of Ireland Using SLÁN Data," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(2), pages 227–250.

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