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Political will and collaboration for electric power reform through renewable energy in Africa

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  • Chineke, Theo Chidiezie
  • Ezike, Fabian M.
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    Abstract

    Climate change, in particular rainfall variability, affects rain-dependent agriculture in Africa. The resulting food shortages, in combination with rising population and lack of access to electricity needed for development, require the governments and people of Africa to consider renewable energy sources. One example that has high potential in Africa is solar energy. Many African governments have begun discussions about renewable energy but tangible results have yet to materialize. This research contributes to the governmental efforts by presenting the solar electricity potentials for some African cities. Using photovoltaic geographical information system (PVGIS) data, it is clear that there is enough electricity for urban and rural dwellers if there is political will and if the solar panels are mounted at the suggested optimal angles ranging from 8-34°. The solar irradiation at all sites was higher than the typical daily domestic load requirement of 2324 Wh/m2 in urban and rural areas. We provide a strong rationale for political will, collaboration and transparent energy policies that will ensure that life is enhanced through the use of environmentally-friendly renewable energy technologies such as solar power.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 38 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 678-684

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:1:p:678-684

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

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    Keywords: Political will Renewable energy Africa;

    References

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    1. Templet, Paul H., 1999. "Energy, diversity and development in economic systems; an empirical analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 223-233, August.
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    7. Louw, Kate & Conradie, Beatrice & Howells, Mark & Dekenah, Marcus, 2008. "Determinants of electricity demand for newly electrified low-income African households," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 2814-2820, August.
    8. Sebitosi, A.B. & Pillay, P., 2008. "Grappling with a half-hearted policy: The case of renewable energy and the environment in South Africa," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 2513-2516, July.
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    Cited by:
    1. Thiam, Djiby Racine, 2011. "An energy pricing scheme for the diffusion of decentralized renewable technology investment in developing countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4284-4297, July.
    2. Morgan Bazilian & Patrick Nussbaumer & Hans-Holger Rogner & Abeeku Brew-Hammond & Vivien Foster & Shonali Pachauri & Eric Williams & Mark Howells & Philippe Niyongabo & Lawrence Musaba & Brian Ó Gall, 2011. "Energy Access Scenarios to 2030 for the Power Sector in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 2011.68, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.

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