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Cross-national trends in earnings inequality and instability

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  • Daly, Mary C.
  • Valletta, Robert G.

Abstract

We compare trends in earnings inequality in the United States, Germany, and Great Britain. Estimation of a heterogeneous growth model of permanent and transitory earnings variation reveals substantial convergence in the permanent component of inequality in these countries during the 1990s.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 99 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 215-219

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:99:y:2008:i:2:p:215-219

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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References

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  1. Xavier Ramos, 2003. "The Covariance Structure of Earnings in Great Britain, 1991-1999," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 70(278), pages 353-374, 05.
  2. Steven J. Haider, 2000. "Earnings Instability and Earnings Inequality of Males in the United States: 1967-1991," Working Papers 00-15, RAND Corporation Publications Department.
  3. Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 1994. "The Growth of Earnings Instability in the U.S. Labor Market," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 25(2), pages 217-272.
  4. Robert G. Valletta, 2006. "The Ins And Outs Of Poverty In Advanced Economies: Government Policy And Poverty Dynamics In Canada, Germany, Great Britain, And The United States," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 52(2), pages 261-284, 06.
  5. Gottschalk, Peter & Smeeding, Timothy M., 2000. "Empirical evidence on income inequality in industrialized countries," Handbook of Income Distribution, in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 5, pages 261-307 Elsevier.
  6. Burkhauser, Richard V & Holtz-Eakin, Douglas & Rhody, Stephen E, 1997. "Labor Earnings Mobility and Inequality in the United States and Germany during the Growth Years of the 1980s," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 38(4), pages 775-94, November.
  7. Cappellari, Lorenzo, 2002. "Earnings dynamics and uncertainty in Italy: how do they differ between the private and public sectors?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 477-496, September.
  8. Javier Alvarez, 2004. "Dynamics and Seasonality in Quarterly Panel Data: An Analysis of Earnings Mobility in Spain," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 22, pages 443-456, October.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Aedín Doris & Donal O’Neill & Olive Sweetman, 2013. "Identification of the covariance structure of earnings using the GMM estimator," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 343-372, September.
  2. Myck, Michal & Ochmann, Richard & Qari, Salmai, 2008. "Dynamics of Earnings and Hourly Wages in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 3751, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Stephen Jenkins & Peter Lambert, 2011. "Robert Moffitt and Peter Gottschalk’s 1995 paper ‘Trends in the covariance structure of earnings in the US: 1969–1987’," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 433-437, September.
  4. Aedin Doris & Donal O’Neill & Olive Sweetman, 2008. "Does Growth Affect the Nature of Inequality? Ireland 1994-2001," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n1930708.pdf, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
  5. repec:ese:iserwp:2013-10 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Ethan Cohen-Cole, 2009. "The option value of consumer bankruptcy," Risk and Policy Analysis Unit Working Paper QAU09-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  7. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2013. "Earnings and Labour Market Volatility in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 7491, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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