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Heresy or enlightenment? The well-being age U-shape effect is flat

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  • Kassenboehmer, Sonja C.
  • Haisken-DeNew, John P.
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    Abstract

    The otherwise seemingly robust age U-shape effect on life satisfaction in pooled OLS regressions is refuted with the German SOEP when controlling for panel fixed effects and respondent experience in the panel. Interviewer characteristics also impact significantly on life satisfaction responses.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

    Volume (Year): 117 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 235-238

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:117:y:2012:i:1:p:235-238

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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    Keywords: Life satisfaction; Well-being; Age U-shape;

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    References

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    1. Clark, Andrew E., 2007. "Born To Be Mild? Cohort Effects Don’t (Fully) Explain Why Well-Being Is U-Shaped in Age," IZA Discussion Papers 3170, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2007. "Is Well-being U-Shaped over the Life Cycle?," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 826, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    3. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Markus H. Hahn, 2010. "PanelWhiz: Efficient Data Extraction of Complex Panel Data Sets - An Example Using the German SOEP," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 130(4), pages 643-654.
    4. SonjaC. Kassenboehmer & JohnP. Haisken-DeNew, 2009. "You're Fired! The Causal Negative Effect of Entry Unemployment on Life Satisfaction," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(536), pages 448-462, 03.
    5. Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Paul Frijters, 2004. "How Important is Methodology for the estimates of the determinants of Happiness?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(497), pages 641-659, 07.
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    Cited by:
    1. Adrian Chadi, 2013. "The Role of Interviewer Encounters in Panel Responses on Life Satisfaction," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201311, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    2. Felix FitzRoy & Michael Nolan & Max Steinhardt & David Ulph, 2013. "Testing the Tunnel Effect: Comparison, Age and Happiness in UK and German Panels," Discussion Paper Series, Department of Economics 201304, Department of Economics, University of St. Andrews.
    3. Cheng, Terence C & Powdthavee, Nattavudh & Oswald, Andrew J, 2014. "Longitudinal Evidence for a Midlife Nadir in Human Wellbeing: Results from Four Data Sets," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1037, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    4. Ning Li, 2014. "Multidimensionality of Longitudinal Data: Unlocking the Age-Happiness Puzzle," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n04, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Adrian Chadi, 2013. "Third Person Effects in Interview Responses on Life Satisfaction," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201307, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    6. Weiss, Alexander & King, James E. & Inoue-Murayama, Miho & Matsuzawa, Tetsuro & Oswald, Andrew J., 2012. "Evidence for a ‘Midlife Crisis’ in Great Apes Consistent with the U-Shape in Human Well-Being," IZA Discussion Papers 7009, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Piper, Alan T., 2014. "Sliding down the U-shape? An investigation of the age-well-being relationship, with a focus on young adults," MPRA Paper 55819, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Adrian Chadi, 2014. "Dissatisfied with Life or with Being Interviewed? Happiness and Motivation to Participate in a Survey," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 639, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    9. Mark Wooden & Ning Li, 2014. "Panel Conditioning and Subjective Well-being," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 117(1), pages 235-255, May.

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