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U-shaped female labor participation with economic development: Some panel data evidence

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  • Tam, Henry
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    Abstract

    Using a panel data of about 130 countries from 1950 to 1980, we use dynamic panel data estimation to demonstrate that the U-shaped relationship between feminization of the labor force and real GDP per capita holds up as an intertemporal relationship.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V84-51GHWPT-1/2/fc534b28c367df8aacc8718c3e798106
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

    Volume (Year): 110 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (February)
    Pages: 140-142

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:110:y:2011:i:2:p:140-142

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

    Related research

    Keywords: Female labor participation rate Economic development Dynamic panel data estimation Kuznets fallacy;

    References

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    1. Ravallion, Martin, 1995. "Growth and poverty: Evidence for developing countries in the 1980s," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 48(3-4), pages 411-417, June.
    2. Henry Tam, 2008. "An economic or political Kuznets curve?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 134(3), pages 367-389, March.
    3. Richard Blundell & Steve Bond, 1995. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," IFS Working Papers W95/17, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    4. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
    5. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
    6. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
    7. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1998. "New ways of looking at old issues: inequality and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 259-287.
    8. Cagatay, Nilufer & Ozler, Sule, 1995. "Feminization of the labor force: The effects of long-term development and structural adjustment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1883-1894, November.
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    Cited by:
    1. Isis Gaddis & Stephan Klasen, 2014. "Economic development, structural change, and women’s labor force participation:," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 639-681, July.
    2. Stephan Klasen & Janneke Pieters, 2013. "What explains the stagnation of female labor force participation in urban India?," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 146, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    3. Tsani, Stella & Paroussos, Leonidas & Fragiadakis, Costas & Charalambidis, Ioannis & Capros, Pantelis, 2013. "Female labour force participation and economic growth in the South Mediterranean countries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(2), pages 323-328.
    4. Fakih, Ali & Ghazalian, Pascal L., 2013. "Female Labour Force Participation in MENA's Manufacturing Sector: The Implications of Firm-Related and National Factors," IZA Discussion Papers 7197, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Ewa Lechman, 2014. "Female labor force participation and economic growth– re-examination of U-shaped curve," GUT FME Working Paper Series A 21, Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology.

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