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Agriculture and aggregation

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  • Córdoba, Juan Carlos
  • Ripoll, Marla

Abstract

We study the shape of the aggregate production function in the presence of land-intensive agriculture. The traditional Cobb-Douglas formulation is corrected to include a "diversification component." The implied TFP differences across countries are larger than what Solow residuals suggest.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 105 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 110-112

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:105:y:2009:i:1:p:110-112

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Keywords: Aggregate production function Diversification Solow residuals Development accounting;

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References

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  1. Francesco Caselli, 2005. "Accounting for Cross-Country Income Differences," CEP Discussion Papers dp0667, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. Diego Restuccia & Dennis Tao Yang & Xiaodong Zhu, 2007. "Agriculture and Aggregate Productivity: A Quantitative Cross-Country Analysis," Working Papers e07-3, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker Than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116, February.
  4. Temple, Jonathan & Wößmann, Ludger, 2006. "Dualism and cross-country growth regressions," Munich Reprints in Economics 19619, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  5. Douglas Gollin, 2002. "Getting Income Shares Right," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 458-474, April.
  6. Gollin, Douglas & Parente, Stephen L. & Rogerson, Richard, 2000. "Farm Work, Home Work And International Productivity Differences," 2000 Annual meeting, July 30-August 2, Tampa, FL 21797, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  7. Vollrath, Dietrich, 2009. "How important are dual economy effects for aggregate productivity?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 325-334, March.
  8. Peter Klenow & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 1997. "The Neoclassical Revival in Growth Economics: Has It Gone Too Far?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 73-114 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Cordoba, Juan Carlos & Ripoll, Marla, 2010. "Endogenous Tfp and Cross-Country Income Differences," Staff General Research Papers 32116, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Dietrich Vollrath, 2013. "The Efficiency of Human Capital Allocations in Developing Countries," Working Papers 201307956, Department of Economics, University of Houston.
  3. Lorenzo Burlon, 2014. "Public expenditure distribution, voting, and growth," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 961, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  4. Herrendorf, Berthold & Valentinyi, Akos, 2005. "What Sectors Make the Poor Countries So Unproductive?," CEPR Discussion Papers 5399, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Markus Eberhardt & Francis Teal, . "Aggregation versus Heterogeneity in Cross-Country Growth Empirics," Discussion Papers 11/08, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
  6. Alex Mourmouras & Peter Rangazad, 2007. "Reconciling Kuznets and Habbakuk in a Unified Growth Theory," Working Papers wp200704, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Department of Economics.
  7. Alonso-Carrera, Jaime & Raurich, Xavier, 2010. "Growth, sectoral composition, and the evolution of income levels," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2440-2460, December.
  8. Marla, Ripoll & Juan, Cordoba, 2006. "The Role of Education in Development," MPRA Paper 1864, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2007.
  9. Trevor Tombe, 2012. "The Missing Food Problem," Working Papers tt0060, Wilfrid Laurier University, Department of Economics, revised 2012.
  10. Trevor Tombe, 2010. "The Missing Food Problem: How Low Agricultural Imports Contribute to International Income and Productivity Differences," Working Papers tecipa-416, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  11. Areendam Chanda & Carl-Johan Dalgaard, 2008. "Dual Economies and International Total Factor Productivity Differences: Channelling the Impact from Institutions, Trade, and Geography," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(300), pages 629-661, November.
  12. Cai, Wenbiao, 2010. "Skill Investment, Farm Size Distribution and Agricultural Productivity," MPRA Paper 26439, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. María Dolores Guilló & Fidel Pérez Sebastián, 2006. "The Quest for Productivity Growth in Agriculture and Manufacturing," DEGIT Conference Papers c011_005, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.

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