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Which Sectors Make Poor Countries So Unproductive?

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  • Berthold Herrendorf
  • Ákos Valentinyi

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1542-4774.2011.01062.x
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by European Economic Association in its journal Journal of the European Economic Association.

Volume (Year): 10 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 (04)
Pages: 323-341

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Handle: RePEc:bla:jeurec:v:10:y:2012:i:2:p:323-341

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Cited by:
  1. Richard Rogerson & Akos Valentinyi & Berthold Herrendorf, 2007. "Growth and Structural Transformation," 2007 Meeting Papers 757, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Yongseok Shin & Joe Kaboski & Francisco J. Buera, 2008. "Finance and Development: A Tale of Two Sectors," 2008 Meeting Papers 955, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Trevor Tombe, 2012. "The Missing Food Problem," Working Papers tt0060, Wilfrid Laurier University, Department of Economics, revised 2012.
  4. Daniel P. Murphy, 2013. "Why are goods and services more expensive in rich countries? demand complementarities and cross-country price differences," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 156, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  5. Todd Schoellman & Berthold Herrendorf, 2011. "Why is Agricultural Labor Productivity so Low in the United States?," 2011 Meeting Papers 1087, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Desmet, Klaus & Rossi-Hansberg, Esteban, 2012. "On the Spatial Economic Impact of Global Warming," CEPR Discussion Papers 9220, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Michael Sposi, 2013. "Trade barriers and the relative price tradables," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 139, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  8. Douglas Gollin, 2012. "The Agricultural Productivity Gap in Developing Countries," 2012 Meeting Papers 510, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  9. Fadi Hassan, 2014. "The Price of Development," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp446, IIIS.
  10. García-Belenguer, Fernando & Santos, Manuel S., 2013. "Investment rates and the aggregate production function," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 150-169.
  11. Dzmitry Kruk & Kateryna Bornukova, 2013. "Belarusian Economic Growth Decomposition," BEROC Working Paper Series 24, Belarusian Economic Research and Outreach Center (BEROC).
  12. Ana Fernandes, 2012. "Institutions and the Sectoral Organization of Production," Diskussionsschriften dp1207, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.

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