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Nutritional Status During an Economic Crisis: Evidence from Russia

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  • Steven Stillman
  • Duncan Thomas

Abstract

Between 1996 and 1998, Russia experienced a spectacular decline in economic activity which was followed by a dramatic rebound between 1998 and 2000. We use panel data to examine the impact of variation in household resources on six dimensions of nutritional status, distinguishing longer-run from short-term fluctuations in resources. Nutritional status is very resilient to short-term variation in household resources. Gross energy intake, adult weight and child stature change very little as expenditure deviates from its long-run average. Longer-run resources have a substantively large, positive and significant effect on energy intake, diet quality, adult weight and child stature. The evidence indicates that individuals and households are able to weather short-term fluctuations in economic resources, at least in terms of maintaining body mass and energy intake. Copyright (C) The Author(s). Journal compilation (C) Royal Economic Society 2008.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 118 (2008)
Issue (Month): 531 (08)
Pages: 1385-1417

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Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:118:y:2008:i:531:p:1385-1417

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Cited by:
  1. Luc Christiaensen & Peter Lanjouw & Jill Luoto & David Stifel, 2012. "Small area estimation-based prediction methods to track poverty: validation and applications," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 267-297, June.
  2. Richard H. Steckel, 2008. "Heights and Human Welfare: Recent Developments and New Directions," NBER Working Papers 14536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Staudigel, Matthias, 2011. "How (much) do food prices contribute to obesity in Russia?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 133-147, March.
  4. Herzfeld, Thomas & Huffman, Sonya & Rizov, Marian, 2014. "The dynamics of food, alcohol and cigarette consumption in Russia during transition," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 128-143.
  5. Jahns, Lisa & Adair, Linda & Mroz, Thomas & Popkin, Barry M., 2012. "The declining prevalence of overweight among Russian children: Income, diet, and physical activity behavior changes," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 139-146.
  6. Katsushi S. Imai & Raghav Gaiha & Ganesh Thapa & Samuel Kobina Annim, 2013. "Financial Crisis In Asia: Its Genesis, Severity And Impact On Poverty And Hunger," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(8), pages 1105-1116, November.
  7. Staudigel, Matthias, 2010. "The Demand For Food Quality In Russia And Its Linkage To Obesity," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116444, European Association of Agricultural Economists & Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  8. Dimova, Ralitza & Gang, Ira N. & Gbakou, Monnet Benoit Patrick & Hoffman, Daniel, 2011. "Can Economic Crises Be Good for Your Diet?," IZA Discussion Papers 5610, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Nivorozhkina, Ludmila & Nivorozhkin, Anton & Abazieva, Kamilla, 2010. "Drop in consumption associated with retirement. The regression discontinuity design approach," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 19(3), pages 112-126.
  10. Dalgaard, Carl-Johan & Strulik, Holger, 2012. "Physiology and Development: Why the West is Taller than the Rest," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-494, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  11. Staudigel, Matthias, 2011. "How do obese people afford to be obese? Consumption strategies of Russian households," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 116065, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  12. Dupas, Pascaline & Robinson, Jonathan, 2012. "The (hidden) costs of political instability: Evidence from Kenya's 2007 election crisis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 314-329.
  13. Ralitza Dimova & Ira N. Gang & Monnet B. P. Gbakou & Daniel Hoffman, 2012. "The impact of food and economic crises on diet and nutrition," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 17512, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
  14. Felfe, Christina & Deuchert. Eva, 2011. "The tempest: Using a natural disaster to evaluate the link between wealth and child development," Economics Working Paper Series 1146, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  15. Eva Deuchert & Christina Felfe, 2013. "The Tempest: Natural Disasters, Early Shocks and Children's Short- and Long-Run Development," CESifo Working Paper Series 4168, CESifo Group Munich.

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