Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

An Update and Extension of the Canadian Evidence on Gender Wage Differentials

Contents:

Author Info

  • Michael P. Kidd
  • Michael Shannon

Abstract

This paper utilizes the 1989 Labour Market Activity Survey to examine the gender wage differential in Canada. The aim is to update previous studies and extend earlier analysis in two significant ways. First, occupation is treated as endogenously determined. Secondly, the Zabalza and Arrufat (1985) imputation method is utilized to estimate the level of female labor-market experience. The results suggest that the level of estimated gender discrimination is sensitive to the measure of labor-market experience. The paper also concludes that intraoccupation wage effects explain most of the gender wage gap. The paper utilizes the 1989 Labour Market Activity Survey to examine the gender wage differential in Canada. The aim is to update previous studies and extend earlier analysis in two significant ways. First, occupation is treated as endogenously determined. Secondly, the Zabalza and Arrufat (1985) imputation method is utilized to estimate the level of female labour market experience. The results suggest that the level of estimated gender discrimination is sensitive to the measure of labour market experience. The paper also concludes that intra-occupation wage effects explain most of the gender wage gap.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0008-4085%28199411%2927%3A4%3C918%3AAUAEOT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-I
Download Restriction: only available to JSTOR subscribers

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Canadian Economics Association in its journal Canadian Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 27 (1994)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 918-38

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:27:y:1994:i:4:p:918-38

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Canadian Economics Association Prof. Steven Ambler, Secretary-Treasurer c/o Olivier Lebert, CEA/CJE/CPP Office C.P. 35006, 1221 Fleury Est Montréal, Québec, Canada H2C 3K4
Email:
Web page: http://economics.ca/cje/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:
Web: http://economics.ca/en/membership.php

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Michael Baker & Nicole M. Fortin, 2001. "Occupational gender composition and wages in Canada, 1987-1988," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(2), pages 345-376, May.
  2. Margaret Yap, 2010. "Slicing and dicing the gender/racial earnings differentials," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(4), pages 466-488, July.
  3. Fatma El-Hamidi, 2007. "Have Economic Reforms Paid Off? Gender Occupational Inequality in the New Millennium in Egypt," Working Papers 338, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2008.
  4. Sarker, Debnarayan & Chakraborty, Sanjukta, 2006. "Household decision-making in agricultural labour household: a case study of West Bengal," MPRA Paper 33504, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Liu, Pak-Wai & Zhang, Junsen & Chong, Shu-Chuen, 2004. "Occupational segregation and wage differentials between natives and immigrants: evidence from Hong Kong," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 395-413, February.
  6. Finnie, Ross & Wannell, Ted, 2004. "The Evolution of the Gender Earnings Gap Amongst Canadian University Graduates," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2004235e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  7. Marie Drolet, 2002. "New Evidence on Gender Pay Differentials: Does Measurement Matter?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 28(1), pages 1-16, March.
  8. Nicole M. Fortin & Michael Huberman, 2002. "Occupational Gender Segregation and Women's Wages in Canada: An Historical Perspective," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 28(s1), pages 11-39, May.
  9. Ross Finnie & Ted Wannell, 2004. "Evolution of the gender earnings gap among Canadian university graduates," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(17), pages 1967-1978.
  10. Geeta Gandhi Kingdon & Jeemol Unni, 2001. "Education and Women's Labour Market Outcomes in India," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 173-195.
  11. Finnie, Ross & Wannell, Ted, 2004. "L'evolution de l'ecart des gains entre les sexes chez les diplomes des universites canadiennes," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2004235f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
  12. Raquel Vale Mendes, 2009. "Gender wage differentials and occupational distribution," Notas Económicas, Faculdade de Economia, Universidade de Coimbra, issue 29, pages 26-40, June.
  13. Eric Solberg, 2004. "Occupational assignment, hiring discrimination, and the gender pay gap," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 32(1), pages 11-27, March.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:27:y:1994:i:4:p:918-38. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Prof. Werner Antweiler).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.