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Saving, Wealth and the Transition from Transfers to Individual Responsibility: The Cases of Taiwan and the United States

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  • Ronald Lee
  • Andrew Mason
  • Timothy Miller

Abstract

Under the life-cycle saving model, population aging leads to an increased demand for life-cycle wealth. Changes in transfer systems create or destroy one component of life-cycle wealth-transfer wealth. The decline in the familial transfer system in Taiwan and reform of the US Social Security system are two examples of ways that transfer wealth is reduced. The combined effects of aging and changes in transfer systems are analyzed using simulation analysis. Rapid aging and radical decline in transfer systems lead to a large but transitory surge in aggregate saving. Capital per worker increases rapidly and remains at a high level. Copyright The editors of the "Scandinavian Journal of Economics", 2003 .

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal The Scandinavian Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 105 (2003)
Issue (Month): 3 (09)
Pages: 339-358

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Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:105:y:2003:i:3:p:339-358

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  1. Reinhart, Carmen & Ogaki, Masao & Ostry, Jonathan, 1996. "Saving Behavior in Low- and Middle-Income Developing Countries: A Comparison," MPRA Paper 6978, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Taylor, A.M., 1991. "Capital Flows to the New World as an Intergenerational Transfer," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1579, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  3. Martin Feldstein, 1997. "Transition to a Fully Funded Pension System: Five Economic Issues," NBER Working Papers 6149, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. repec:dgr:uvatin:2007051 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Kam-Ki Tang & Benjamin ShiJie Wong, . "The Ageing, Longevity and Crowding Out Effects on Private and Public Savings: Evidence from Dynamic Panel Analysis," MRG Discussion Paper Series 3409, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  3. Antoine Bommier, . "Mortality Decline, Impatience and Aggregate Wealth Accumulation with Risk-Sensitive Preferences," Working Papers ETH-RC-14-006, ETH Zurich, Chair of Systems Design.
  4. Shimasawa, Manabu & Oguro, Kazumasa & Masujima, Minoru, 2014. "Population Aging, Policy Reforms, and Lifetime Net Tax Rate in Japan: A Generational Accounting Approach," CIS Discussion paper series 625, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  5. Ronald Lee, 2012. "Macroeconomic Implications of Demographic Changes: A Global Perspective," IMES Discussion Paper Series 12-E-11, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
  6. Concepció Patxot & Elisenda Renteria & Miguel Sánchez Romero & Guadalupe Souto, 2012. "Measuring the balance of government intervention on forward and backward family transfers using NTA estimates: the modified Lee Arrows," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2012-015, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  7. Bernardo Lanza Queiroz & Cássio Maldonado Turra & Elisenda Renteria Perez, 2006. "The Opportunities We Cannot Forgo: Economic Consequences Of Population Changes In Brazil," Anais do XXXIV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 34th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 32, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
  8. Antoine Bommier, 2014. "Mortality Decline, Impatience and Aggregate Wealth Accumulation with Risk-Sensitive Preferences," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 14/194, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
  9. Hendrik P. van Dalen, 2007. "Global Aging and Economic Convergence: A Real Option or Still a Case of Science Fiction?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 07-051/1, Tinbergen Institute.
  10. Andrew Mason & Ronald Lee & Sang-Hyop Lee, 2010. "The Demographic Transition and Economic Growth in the Pacific Rim," NBER Chapters, in: The Economic Consequences of Demographic Change in East Asia, NBER-EASE Volume 19, pages 19-55 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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