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Security Issue Timing: What Do Managers Know, and When Do They Know It?

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  • DIRK JENTER
  • KATHARINA LEWELLEN
  • JEROLD B. WARNER

Abstract

We study put option sales undertaken by corporations during their repurchase programs. Put sales' main theoretical motivation is market timing, providing an excellent framework for studying whether security issues reflect managers' ability to identify mispricing. Our evidence is that these bets reflect timing ability, and are not simply a result of overconfidence. In the 100 days following put option issues, there is roughly a 5% abnormal stock price return, and the abnormal return is concentrated around the first earnings release date following put option sales. Longer term effects are generally not detected. Put sales also appear to reflect successful bets on the direction of stock price volatility.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Finance Association in its journal Journal of Finance.

Volume (Year): 66 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (04)
Pages: 413-443

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Handle: RePEc:bla:jfinan:v:66:y:2011:i:2:p:413-443

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References

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  1. Fama, Eugene F. & French, Kenneth R., 1997. "Industry costs of equity," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 153-193, February.
  2. Mitchell, Mark L & Stafford, Erik, 2000. "Managerial Decisions and Long-Term Stock Price Performance," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73(3), pages 287-329, July.
  3. Fama, Eugene F. & French, Kenneth R., 1993. "Common risk factors in the returns on stocks and bonds," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 3-56, February.
  4. Itzhak Ben-David & John R. Graham & Campbell R. Harvey, 2007. "Managerial Overconfidence and Corporate Policies," NBER Working Papers 13711, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Lie, Erik, 2005. "Operating performance following open market share repurchase announcements," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 411-436, September.
  6. Erik Lie, 2001. "Detecting Abnormal Operating Performance: Revisited," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 30(2), Summer.
  7. Gustavo Grullon & Roni Michaely, 2004. "The Information Content of Share Repurchase Programs," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(2), pages 651-680, 04.
  8. Lakonishok, Josef & Lee, Inmoo, 2001. "Are Insider Trades Informative?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 14(1), pages 79-111.
  9. Gyoshev, Stanley & Kaplan, Todd R. & Szewczyk, Samuel & Tsetsekos, George, 2012. "Why Do Financial Intermediaries Buy Put Options from Companies?," MPRA Paper 43149, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. James J. Angel & Gary L. Gastineau & Clifford J. Weber, 1997. "Using Exchange-Traded Equity "Flex" Put Options In Corporate Stock Repurchase Programs," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 10(1), pages 109-113.
  11. Urs Peyer, 2009. "The Nature and Persistence of Buyback Anomalies," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(4), pages 1693-1745, April.
  12. Malcolm Baker & Richard S. Ruback & Jeffrey Wurgler, 2004. "Behavioral Corporate Finance: A Survey," NBER Working Papers 10863, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Gyoshev, Stanley & Kaplan, Todd R. & Szewczyk, Samuel & Tsetsekos, George, 2012. "Why Do Financial Intermediaries Buy Put Options from Companies?," MPRA Paper 43149, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Missaka Warusawitharana & Toni M. Whited, 2013. "Equity market misvaluation, financing, and investment," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-78, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  3. Edmans, Alex, 2011. "Does the stock market fully value intangibles? Employee satisfaction and equity prices," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(3), pages 621-640, September.

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