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Economics of Food Energy Density and Adolescent Body Weight

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  • M. CHRISTOPHER AULD
  • LISA M. POWELL

Abstract

We present a simple microeconomic behavioral model showing that decreases in the price of energy-dense foods increase body weight if the price of obtaining a calorie from dense food is lower than that of less dense food. Estimates of the determinants of adolescent BMI suggest that the price of high-density food is negatively related to BMI whereas the price of low density food is positively related. Restaurant availability is not associated with weight, but increases in supermarket density predict lower weight. Quantile regressions show that most of the changes in body weight occur in the top quintile of the conditional distribution of BMI. Copyright (c) The London School of Economics and Political Science 2008.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by London School of Economics and Political Science in its journal Economica.

Volume (Year): 76 (2009)
Issue (Month): 304 (October)
Pages: 719-740

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Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:76:y:2009:i:304:p:719-740

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Pieroni, Luca & Lanari, Donatella & Salmasi, Luca, 2010. "Food Prices and Overweight Patterns in Italy," MPRA Paper 23744, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Han, Euna & Powell, Lisa M. & Isgor, Zeynep, 2012. "Supplemental nutrition assistance program and body weight outcomes: The role of economic contextual factors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(12), pages 1874-1881.
  3. Kerry Anne McGeary, 2009. "The Impact of State-Level Nutrition-Education Program Funding on BMI: Evidence from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," NBER Working Papers 15001, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Mandal, Bidisha & Powell, Lisa M., 2013. "Child Care Choices, Food Choices, and Children’s Obesity Status," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149432, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  5. Dana Goldman & Darius Lakdawalla & Yuhui Zheng, 2009. "Food Prices and the Dynamics of Body Weight," NBER Working Papers 15096, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Grossman, Michael & Tekin, Erdal & Wada, Roy, 2013. "Food Prices and Body Fatness among Youths," IZA Discussion Papers 7465, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Han, Euna & Powell, Lisa M. & Pugach, Oksana, 2011. "The heterogenous relationship of food stamp participation with body mass: Quantile regression model," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 499-506, August.
  8. Pieroni, Luca & Salmasi, Luca, 2010. "Body weight and socio-economic determinants: quantile estimations from the British Household Panel Survey," MPRA Paper 26434, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Wendt, Minh & Todd, Jessica E., 2011. "The Effect of Food and Beverage Prices on Children's Weights," Economic Research Report 134705, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  10. Auld, M. Christopher, 2011. "Effect of large-scale social interactions on body weight," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 303-316, March.
  11. Yamamura, Eiji, 2010. "Influence of body image in urbanized areas: Differences in long-term changes in teenage body mass index between boys and girls in Japan," MPRA Paper 23436, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Powell, Lisa M. & Wada, Roy & Krauss, Ramona C. & Wang, Youfa, 2012. "Ethnic disparities in adolescent body mass index in the United States: The role of parental socioeconomic status and economic contextual factors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 469-476.
  13. Gustavsen, Geir Wæhler & Rickertsen, Kyrre, 2013. "Adjusting VAT rates to promote healthier diets in Norway: A censored quantile regression approach," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 88-95.
  14. Cotti, Chad & Tefft, Nathan, 2013. "Fast food prices, obesity, and the minimum wage," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 134-147.
  15. Pieroni, L. & Salmasi, L., 2014. "Fast-food consumption and body weight. Evidence from the UK," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 94-105.
  16. Yamamura, Eiji, 2010. "Comparison of long-term changes in teenage body mass index between urban and other areas in Japan from 1986 to 2003," MPRA Paper 21798, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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