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Centrality and Creativity: Does Richard Florida's Creative Class Offer New Insights into Urban Hierarchy?

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  • Mark Lorenzen
  • Kristina Vaarst Andersen
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    Abstract

    To provide new insights into urban hierarchy, this article brings together one of economic geography's oldest and most well-established notions with one of its newest and most disputed notions: Christäller's centrality and Florida's creative class. Using a novel original database, the article compares the distribution of the general population and the creative class across 444 city regions in 8 European countries. It finds that the two groups are both distributed according to the rank-size rule, but exhibit different distinct phases with different slopes. The article argues that the two distributions are different because market thresholds for creative services and jobs are lower than thresholds for less specialized services and jobs. The article hence concludes that centrality exerts a strong influence upon urban hierarchies of creativity and that the study of creative urban city hierarchies yields new insights into the problem of centrality. Copyright (c) 2009 Clark University.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Clark University in its journal Economic Geography.

    Volume (Year): 85 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 4 (October)
    Pages: 363-390

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:ecgeog:v:85:y:2009:i:4:p:363-390

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    Cited by:
    1. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2013. "Agglomeration Economies in Classical Music," Trinity Economics Papers, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics tep0213, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    2. Chantelot Sébastien, 2011. "French creative clusters: An exploratory spatial data analysis," ERSA conference papers ersa10p477, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Tiiu PAAS & Vivika HALAPUU, 2012. "Attitudes towards immigrants and the integration of ethnically diverse societies," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 3, pages 161-176, December.
    4. Christoph Alfken & Tom Broekel & Rolf Sternberg, 2013. "Factors explaining the spatial agglomeration of the Creative Class. Empirical evidence for German artists," Working Papers on Innovation and Space 2013-02, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    5. Sara Santos Cruz & Aurora A.C. Teixeira, 2013. "The neglected heterogeneity of spatial agglomeration and co-location patterns of creative employment: evidence from Portugal," FEP Working Papers 508, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

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