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Is Government Spending Stimulative?

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  • DAVID ALAN ASCHAUER

Abstract

This paper develops and implements a neoclassical model of fiscal policy. The paper's main empirical hypothesis is that government non-military investment spending is more expansionary than is either government consumption or military investment. The paper utilizes annual data to support the hypothesis. It finds that output "multipliers" for government non-military investment significantly exceed unity while multipliers for government consumption and military investment lie below unity. The paper also finds that public sector deficits-both actual and cyclically adjusted-contain minor explanatory power for output when one controls for the effects of non-military investment. Copyright 1990 Western Economic Association International.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Contemporary Economic Policy.

Volume (Year): 8 (1990)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 30-46

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Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:8:y:1990:i:4:p:30-46

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Cited by:
  1. Rajkumar, Andrew Sunil & Swaroop, Vinaya, 2002. "Public spending and outcomes : does governance matter?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2840, The World Bank.
  2. Miguel D. Ramirez, 2006. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Enhance Labor Productivity Growth in Chile? A Cointegration Analysis," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 32(2), pages 205-220, Spring.
  3. Allcott, Hunt & Lederman, Daniel & Lopez, Ramon, 2006. "Political institutions, inequality, and agricultural growth : the public expenditure connection," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3902, The World Bank.
  4. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Sylvia A. R. Tijmstra & Adala Bwire, 2007. "Fiscal decentralisation, efficiency, and growth," Working Papers 2007-11, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales.
  5. Ramirez, Miguel D., 2006. "Is foreign direct investment beneficial for Mexico? An empirical analysis, 1960-2001," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 802-817, May.
  6. Ansari, M. I., 2002. "Impact of financial development, money, and public spending on Malaysian national income: an econometric study," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 72-93.
  7. G.E. Hebbink, 2000. "Demographic ageing and sustainability of fiscal policy: projections with a renewed generational accounting model," WO Research Memoranda (discontinued) 609, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  8. Sharon J. Erenburg, . "Linking Public Capital to Economic Performance, Public Capital: The Missing Link Between Investment and Economic Growth ," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive 14, Levy Economics Institute.
  9. Mohammad Haque & Niloy Bose & Denise R. Osborn, 2004. "Public expenditure and growth in developing countries: education is the key," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2003 41, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
  10. Fu, Feng-Cheng & Vijverberg, Chu-Ping C. & Vijverberg, Wim P., 2004. "Public Infrastructure as a Determinant of Intertemporal and Interregional Productive Performance in China," IZA Discussion Papers 1019, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Sutaria, Vinod & Hicks, Donald, 2002. "The determinants of new firm formation dynamics," ERSA conference papers ersa02p399, European Regional Science Association.
  12. Ansari, M. I., 1996. "Monetary vs. fiscal policy: Some evidence from vector autoregression for India," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 677-698.

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