Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Is a slowdown in agricultural productivity growth contributing to the rise in commodity prices?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Keith O. Fuglie

Abstract

A slowdown in the rate of agricultural productivity growth is thought by many observers to be contributing to the recent rise in agricultural prices. In this article I decompose sources of output growth in global agriculture into aggregate input and total factor productivity (TFP) components and examine whether productivity growth slowed substantially in the years leading up to the recent rise in commodity prices. Contrary to widely held perceptions, I find no evidence of a general slowdown in sector-wide agricultural TFP, at least through 2006. If anything, the growth rate in agricultural TFP accelerated in recent decades. However, the results do show a slowdown in the growth of agricultural investment. Accelerating TFP growth largely offset decelerating input growth to keep the real output of global agriculture growing at about 2% per year since the 1960s. Regionally, however, agricultural productivity performance has been uneven. These findings have important implications for the appropriate supply-side policy response to the current agricultural price crisis. Copyright (c) 2008 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1574-0862.2008.00349.x
File Function: link to full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 39 (2008)
Issue (Month): s1 (November)
Pages: 431-441

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:39:y:2008:i:s1:p:431-441

Contact details of provider:
Email:
Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0169-5150
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=0169-5150

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Huffman, Wallace, 2009. "Technology and Innovation in World Agriculture: Prospects for 2010-2019," Staff General Research Papers 13060, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Eldon Ball & David Schimmelpfennig & Sun Ling Wang, 2013. "Is U.S. Agricultural Productivity Growth Slowing?," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 35(3), pages 435-450.
  3. Jean-Paul Chavas & David Hummels & Brian Wright, 2013. "Introduction to "The Economics of Food Price Volatility"," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Food Price Volatility National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Yu, Bingxin & Nin Pratt, Alejandro, 2011. "Agricultural Productivity and Policies in Sub-Saharan Africa," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 105400, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  5. Rudel, Thomas K., 2013. "Food Versus Fuel: Extractive Industries, Insecure Land Tenure, and Gaps in World Food Production," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 62-70.
  6. Wang, Sun Ling & McPhail, Lihong Lu, 2012. "Impacts of Energy Shocks on US Agricultural Productivity Growth and Food Prices —A Structural VAR Analysis," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124892, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  7. Rada, Nicholas E. & Valdes, Constanza, 2012. "Policy, Technology, and Efficiency of Brazilian Agriculture," Economic Research Report 127498, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  8. Pardey, Philip G. & Alston, Julian M. & Chan-Kang, Connie, 2012. "Agricultural Production, Productivity and R&D over the Past Half Century: An Emerging New World Order," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 131824, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  9. James M. MacDonald, 2012. "Comment on "Influences of Agricultural Technology on the Size and Importance of Food Price Variability"," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Food Price Volatility National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Headey, Derek, 2011. "Rethinking the global food crisis: The role of trade shocks," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 136-146, April.
  11. Butzer, Rita & Mundlak, Yair & Larson, Donald F., 2010. "Measures of fixed capital in agriculture," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5472, The World Bank.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:39:y:2008:i:s1:p:431-441. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.