Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Is it Cost Effective to Segregate Canola in WA?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Crowe, Bronwyn
  • Pluske, Johanna M.
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    If genetically modified (GM) canola varieties are to be released for commercial cultivation in Australia, the Australian canola supply chain would have to consider segregation options if it wishes to continue marketing non-GM canola and comply with worldwide labelling requirements. The feasibility of segregation and cost effectiveness of three possible segregation methods is investigated in this paper. In considering each of these methods the increase in total grain handling cost due to segregation is expected to be between 5 and 9 per cent. Such an increase is comparable with segregation costs reported in Canadian literature.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/126102
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment in its journal Australasian Agribusiness Review.

    Volume (Year): 14 (2006)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages:

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:ags:auagre:126102

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.agrifood.info/review/

    Related research

    Keywords: WA; Western Australia; genetically modified canola; GM; non-GM canola; segregation options; total grain handling cost; Agribusiness; Crop Production/Industries; Farm Management; International Relations/Trade; Production Economics; Productivity Analysis; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; ISSN 1442-6951;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Bullock, D. S. & Desquilbet, M., 2002. "The economics of non-GMO segregation and identity preservation," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 81-99, February.
    2. Sallie James & Michael Burton, 2003. "Consumer preferences for GM food and other attributes of the food system," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 47(4), pages 501-518, December.
    3. Susan Stone & ; Anna Matysek & ; Andrew Dolling, 2003. "Modelling Possible Impacts of GM Crops on Australian Trade," Urban/Regional 0304002, EconWPA.
    4. William W. Wilson & Bruce L. Dahl, 2005. "Costs and Risks of Testing and Segregating Genetically Modified Wheat," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(2), pages 212-228.
    5. Anderson, Kym & Jackson, Lee Ann, 2005. "GM crop technology and trade restraints: economic implications for Australia and New Zealand," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 49(3), September.
    6. Moschini, GianCarlo & Bulut, Harun & Cembalo, Luigi, 2005. "On the Segregation of Genetically Modified, Conventional, and Organic Products in European Agriculture: A Multi-Market Equilibrium Analysis," Staff General Research Papers 12450, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    7. Andrei Sobolevsky & GianCarlo Moschini & Harvey Lapan, 2005. "Genetically Modified Crops and Product Differentiation: Trade and Welfare Effects in the Soybean Complex," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(3), pages 621-644.
    8. Smyth, Stuart J. & Phillips, Peter W.B., 2001. "Competitors Co-Operating: Establishing A Supply Chain To Manage Genetically Modified Canola," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 4(01).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:auagre:126102. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.