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From access to acceptance: The costs of crossing borders in the global economy


  • Sarianna M. Lundan

    () (University of Bremen - International Management and Governance & ZenTra)


This paper provides an overview of the different kinds of distance-related barriers related to crossborder investment. Expanding the economic footprint of the firm comes at the cost of a corresponding increase in the complexity of coordination. Different forms of governance, whether inside the firm or as part of its network of external relationships, have the aim of reducing uncertainty and creating a more predictable environment. The impact of conventional distancerelated barriers, as well as the more difficult institutional barriers reflecting differences in norms and beliefs, on the costs and methods of coordination adopted by multinational firms are explored.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarianna M. Lundan, 2014. "From access to acceptance: The costs of crossing borders in the global economy," ZenTra Working Papers in Transnational Studies 34 / 2014, ZenTra - Center for Transnational Studies, revised Jun 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:zen:wpaper:34

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Ringlund, Guro Bornes & Rosendahl, Knut Einar & Skjerpen, Terje, 2008. "Does oilrig activity react to oil price changes An empirical investigation," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 371-396, March.
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    6. Felder Stefan & Rutherford Thomas F., 1993. "Unilateral CO2 Reductions and Carbon Leakage: The Consequences of International Trade in Oil and Basic Materials," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 162-176, September.
    7. Carolyn Fischer & Alan K. Fox, 2007. "Output-Based Allocation of Emissions Permits for Mitigating Tax and Trade Interactions," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(4), pages 575-599.
    8. Balistreri, Edward J. & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2012. "Subglobal carbon policy and the competitive selection of heterogeneous firms," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S2), pages 190-197.
    9. Daniel Gros, 2009. "Global Welfare Implications of Carbon Border Taxes," CESifo Working Paper Series 2790, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Caron, Justin, 2012. "Estimating carbon leakage and the efficiency of border adjustments in general equilibrium — Does sectoral aggregation matter?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S2), pages 111-126.
    11. Branger, Frédéric & Quirion, Philippe, 2014. "Would border carbon adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry competitiveness losses? Insights from a meta-analysis of recent economic studies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 29-39.
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    14. repec:zbw:hohpro:345 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Graham, Paul & Thorpe, Sally & Hogan, Lindsay, 1999. "Non-competitive market behaviour in the international coking coal market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 195-212, June.
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    More about this item


    transnational firms; foreign investment; governance; entry barriers; institutional distance;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • M16 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - International Business Administration

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