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Capitale sociale, sviluppo economico e tentativi di misurazione

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  • pina ciani

Abstract

Sottolineando l’importanza della struttura sociale e politico- istituzionale dell’economia ai fini della crescita economica, la formulazione di un adeguato modello interpretativo, nello studio dei processi di industrializzazione, richiede di interpretare il rapporto tra economia, società e sistema politico-istituzionale in termini di interdipendenza e influenza reciproca nella necessità di un approccio complesso, multidimensionale e non monocausale al processo di sviluppo, nell’ambito del quale anche il capitale sociale deve essere considerato uno strumento al fine dell’elaborazione di politiche in grado di promuovere la crescita economica. Il capitale sociale, infatti, è dato da quegli aspetti di una società che, sebbene difficili da misurare e da inserire in modelli formali, sembrano avere un ruolo rilevante nel definire le caratteristiche dello sviluppo economico influenzando il rendimento dell’economia. Obiettivo di questo lavoro è fornire un’introduzione al concetto di capitale sociale cercando di mettere in evidenza, attraverso una rassegna della letteratura sia teorica che empirica, la sua rilevanza ai fini dello sviluppo economico.

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  • pina ciani, 2005. "Capitale sociale, sviluppo economico e tentativi di misurazione," Others 0509019, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpot:0509019 Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 17
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    Keywords

    social capital; capitale sociale; sviluppo economico;

    JEL classification:

    • P - Economic Systems
    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Z - Other Special Topics

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