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The Roles Of Money In An Economy And The Optimum Quantity Of Money

Author

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  • Edgar L. Feige

    (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

  • M. Parkin

    (University of Manchester)

  • R Avery

    (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

  • C. Stones

    (University of Manchester)

Abstract

What is the optimum quantity of money in a society? This paper answers this question both from the perspective of a utility maximizing model with real balances in the utility function, and employing an inventory theoretic model which focuses attention on the costs of transacting in different markets and on the storage costs of holding money. We find that socially optimal transactions patterns and inventory holdings can be induced by paying interest on money and bonds equal to the net rate of return on capital. This conclusion is however only valid if it is costless for the society to institute and operate such an interest payment mechanism. In a world where it is costly to institute and operate an interest payment mechanism, a social optimum requires that the rate of return on money and bonds must equal the net rate of return on capital minus the social cost of inducing individuals to hold optimal quantities of financial assets. It is therefore necessary to take account of both the potential gains in welfare from instituting interest payments on money and the real potential costs of such a policy. Reference: Economica, November, 1973 pp. 416-431

Suggested Citation

  • Edgar L. Feige & M. Parkin & R Avery & C. Stones, 2005. "The Roles Of Money In An Economy And The Optimum Quantity Of Money," Macroeconomics 0501035, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:0501035 Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bewley, Truman, 1983. "A Difficulty with the Optimum Quantity of Money," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(5), pages 1485-1504, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • E59 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Other
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions

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