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Towards a new EU policy for the Mediterranean South? Culture, migration and the de-velopment of social indicators in a wider Europe. Conference Paper, The European Union Neighbourhood Policy, 2nd study seminar - July 5-9, 2004, Jean Monnet Centre, University of Catania


  • Arno TAUSCH

    (Department of Political Science, Innsbruck University)


Both in demographic as well as in sociological terms, much of West European fears about East European migration at least conceal the real issues of the future migration processes. An analysis of world population growth trends shows that Africa, West Asia and Southeast-Asia become the real future sending countries, while the demographic structure of East Central Europe more and more resembles the countries of Western Europe. The enlarged Europe becomes California, and the Mediterranean countries become “our” Mexico. That is the structure of the 21st Century. Multiple regression evidence supports these hypotheses. The paper is also available online freely from

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  • Arno TAUSCH, 2005. "Towards a new EU policy for the Mediterranean South? Culture, migration and the de-velopment of social indicators in a wider Europe. Conference Paper, The European Union Neighbourhood Policy, 2nd stud," Labor and Demography 0510009, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0510009
    Note: Type of Document - doc; pages: 40. The paper also tests the cross-national effects of worker remittances on economic growth and human development in over 60 countries of the world system

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    Migration; religion;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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