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Offshore investment by Australian firms: survey evidence


  • Productivity Commission


This paper presents the findings of a new survey by the Commission on what motivates Australian firms to operate or relocate their headquarters offshore, and the implications for Australia. The Commission found that the establishment by Australian firms of operations overseas typically complements their domestic activities. The survey confirms that relatively few firms are relocating their headquarters offshore.

Suggested Citation

  • Productivity Commission, 2002. "Offshore investment by Australian firms: survey evidence," International Trade 0203001, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0203001
    Note: Type of Document - Word 97; prepared on IBM PC; to print on HP; pages: 96 ; figures: included

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Graciela Chichilnisky, 1998. "The knowledge revolution," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 39-54.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mody, Ashoka & Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 2002. "The Role of Information in Driving FDI: Theory and Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 3619, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Assaf Razin, 2004. "The Contribution of FDI Flows to Domestic Investment in Capacity, and Vice Versa," NBER Chapters,in: Growth and Productivity in East Asia, NBER-East Asia Seminar on Economics, Volume 13, pages 149-176 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Assaf Razin & Ashoka Mody & Efraim Sadka, 2003. "The Role of Information in Driving FDI Flows; Host-Country Transparency and Source-Country Specialization," IMF Working Papers 03/148, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Sasan Bakhtiari, 2015. "Productivity, outsourcing and exit: the case of Australian manufacturing," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 425-447, February.
    5. Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka, 2004. "Transparency, Specialization and FDI (new title: Corporate Transparency, Cream-Skimming and FDI)," CESifo Working Paper Series 1161, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Robert E. Lipsey, 2002. "Home and Host Country Effects of FDI," NBER Working Papers 9293, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item


    offshore investment - firms locating offshore - survey - branch office - foreign direct investment - headquarters - branch office;

    JEL classification:

    • M - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics

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