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Japanese Public Support For Official Development Assistance


  • M. J. Gagen

    (University of Queensland)


Public opinion surveys conducted since 1977 in Japan are usually interpreted as showing decreasing support among the Japanese population for Official Development Assistance (ODA), and possibly, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Cabinet Office of Japan have justified recent cuts in ODA funding levels on this basis. However, these interpretations have been based on the assumption that Japanese ODA funding levels have been static over time, which is manifestly incorrect. Here, we take proper account of the changing levels of ODA funding over time to demonstrate that changing survey response rates merely reflect changing ODA funding levels and that Japanese attitudes to ODA have been remarkably constant over the last few decades. We do this by reverse engineering survey results to derive the Japanese population’s preference distribution for ODA funding levels over time.

Suggested Citation

  • M. J. Gagen, 2003. "Japanese Public Support For Official Development Assistance," Econometrics 0310002, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpem:0310002
    Note: Type of Document - Word to PDF; prepared on IBM PC; pages: 18; figures: 9

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dall'Aglio, Marco & Scarsini, Marco, 2001. "When Lorenz met Lyapunov," Statistics & Probability Letters, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 101-105, August.
    2. Hannu Oja, 1999. "Affine Invariant Multivariate Sign and Rank Tests and Corresponding Estimates: a Review," Scandinavian Journal of Statistics, Danish Society for Theoretical Statistics;Finnish Statistical Society;Norwegian Statistical Association;Swedish Statistical Association, vol. 26(3), pages 319-343.
    3. Koshevoy, G. A. & Mosler, K., 1997. "Multivariate Gini Indices," Journal of Multivariate Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 252-276, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kenneth S. Donahue & Thierry Warin, 2009. "Multilateralism cursed by bilateralism: Japan’s Role at the International Whaling Commission," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0904, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.

    More about this item


    Surveys; Japan; Official Development Assistance (ODA); Foreign Aid;

    JEL classification:

    • C42 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Survey Methods
    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid
    • O21 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Planning Models; Planning Policy
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • L31 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Nonprofit Institutions; NGOs; Social Entrepreneurship

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