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Jamaica’S Transformation Towards The New Information Society


  • Peter W Jones

    (Economic Development Institute)


“The swift emergence of a global “information society” is changing the way people live, learn, work and relate. An explosion in the free flow of information and ideas has brought knowledge and its myriad applications to many millions of people, creating new choices and opportunities in some of the most vital realms of human endeavour. Yet too many of the world's people remain untouched by this revolution. A “digital divide” threatens to exacerbate already-wide gaps between rich and poor, within and among countries. The stakes are high indeed. Timely access to news and information can promote trade, education, employment, health and wealth. One of the hallmarks of the information society – openness -- is a crucial ingredient of democracy and good governance. Information and knowledge are also at the heart of efforts to strengthen tolerance, mutual understanding and respect for diversity……….. …The new information and communications technologies are among the driving forces of globalization. They are bringing people together, and bringing decision makers unprecedented new tools for development. At the same time, however, the gap between information 'haves' and 'have-nots' is widening, and there is a real danger that the world's poor will be excluded from the emerging knowledge-based global economy.”

Suggested Citation

  • Peter W Jones, 2004. "Jamaica’S Transformation Towards The New Information Society," Development and Comp Systems 0411007, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0411007
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 79

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Daly, J.A. & Miller, R.R., 1998. "Corporations' Use of the Internet in Developing Countries," Papers 35, World Bank - International Finance Corporation.
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    More about this item


    Information Society; Jamaica Information society; Jamaica; Government; e-government;

    JEL classification:

    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth
    • P - Economic Systems


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