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Micro Theory and Recent Developments in the Study of Economic Institutions Through Economic History

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  • Avner Greif

Abstract

First draft: July, 1995 This draft: March 4, 1996 Prepared for a symposia on Economic History in the Econometric Society, Seventh World Congress, Tokyo 1995. Forthcoming in Advances in Economic Theory. Edited by David M. Kreps and Kenneth F. Wallis. 1996. Cambridge University Press. This paper discusses the three approaches within economic history that utilizes micro-economic theory to examine institutions, their nature, change, and efficiency: the Neo-classical Economics approach, the New Institutional Economic History approach, and Historical Institutional Analysis approach. The focus is on methodology and general results rather than on any specific conclusions regarding institutions in particular historical episodes. Most of the survey is devoted to elaborate on the recent development of Historical Institutional Analysis.

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  • Avner Greif, "undated". "Micro Theory and Recent Developments in the Study of Economic Institutions Through Economic History," Working Papers 96001, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wop:stanec:96001
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    Cited by:

    1. Sanchez-Pages Santiago & Straub Stéphane, 2010. "The Emergence of Institutions," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-38, September.
    2. Stephen Haber, 1996. "The Efficiency Consequences of Institutional Change: Financial Market Regulation and Industrial Productivity Growth in Brazil, 1866-1934," NBER Historical Working Papers 0094, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Masahiko Aoki, 2006. "Mechanisms of Endogenous Institutional Change," Discussion Papers 05-013, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    4. Raimundo Soto, "undated". "Institutional Reforms in the Electricity Sector," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv120, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
    5. Henry Ergas, 2008. "Should Australia Encourage Developing Countries to Adopt Competition Laws?," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 376, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    6. Knack, Stephen, 2002. "Governance and growth: measurement and evidence," MPRA Paper 28050, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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