IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wil/wileco/2015-03.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Collateralized Borrowing and Increasing Risk

Author

Listed:

Abstract

This paper uses a general equilibrium model with collateralized borrowing to show that increases in risk can have ambiguous effects on leverage, loan margins, loan amounts, and asset prices. Increasing risk about future payoffs and endowments can lead to riskier loans with larger balances and lower spreads even when lenders are risk-averse and borrowers can default. As well, increasing the covariance of either agents' endowments with the asset payoff can have ambiguous consequences for equilibrium. Though the effects are ambiguous, key determinants of how increased risk translate into changes in prices and allocations are the correlation of agents' endowments with the asset payoff, agents' risk aversion, and the location of increased risk in the distribution of future states. Some restricted changes in the borrower's or lender's endowments can have unambiguous but asymmetric effects on equilibrium.

Suggested Citation

  • Gregory Phelan, 2015. "Collateralized Borrowing and Increasing Risk," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015-03, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jun 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2015-03
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://web.williams.edu/Economics/wp/Phelan_CollateralizedBorrowing.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Viral V. Acharya & Douglas Gale & Tanju Yorulmazer, 2011. "Rollover Risk and Market Freezes," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(4), pages 1177-1209, August.
    2. Adrian, Tobias & Boyarchenko, Nina, 2012. "Intermediary leverage cycles and financial stability," Staff Reports 567, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, revised 01 Feb 2015.
    3. Adrian, Tobias & Shin, Hyun Song, 2010. "Liquidity and leverage," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 418-437, July.
    4. Nick Bloom & Stephen Bond & John Van Reenen, 2007. "Uncertainty and Investment Dynamics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(2), pages 391-415.
    5. Araújo, Aloísio & Kubler, Felix & Schommer, Susan, 2012. "Regulating collateral-requirements when markets are incomplete," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 147(2), pages 450-476.
    6. Zhiguo He & Arvind Krishnamurthy, 2013. "Intermediary Asset Pricing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(2), pages 732-770, April.
    7. Gary Gorton & Guillermo Ordo?ez, 2014. "Collateral Crises," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(2), pages 343-378, February.
    8. Gorton, Gary & Metrick, Andrew, 2012. "Securitized banking and the run on repo," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 425-451.
    9. Rubén Poblete-Cazenave & Juan Torres-Martínez, 2013. "Equilibrium with limited-recourse collateralized loans," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 53(1), pages 181-211, May.
    10. Fostel, Ana & Geanakoplos, John, 2012. "Why does bad news increase volatility and decrease leverage?," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 147(2), pages 501-525.
    11. Aloisio Araujo, 2015. "General equilibrium, preferences and financial institutions after the crisis," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 58(2), pages 217-254, February.
    12. Nicholas Bloom, 2009. "The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(3), pages 623-685, May.
    13. Bo Zhao, 2015. "Rational housing bubble," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 60(1), pages 141-201, September.
    14. John Geanakoplos & Ana Fostel, 2008. "Leverage Cycles and the Anxious Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1211-1244, September.
    15. Alp Simsek, 2013. "Belief Disagreements and Collateral Constraints," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 81(1), pages 1-53, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Feixue Gong & Gregory Phelan, 2015. "Debt Collateralization, Capital Structure, and Maximal Leverage," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015-13, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jul 2016.
    2. Ana Fostel & John Geanakoplos & Gregory Phelan, 2015. "Global Collateral: How Financial Innovation Drives Capital Flows and Increases Financial Instability," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015-12, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Feb 2017.
    3. repec:eee:mateco:v:73:y:2017:i:c:p:68-80 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Gong Feixue & Gregory Phelan, 2017. "Debt Collateralization, Structured Finance, and the CDS Basis," Department of Economics Working Papers 2017-06, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Leverage; risk; collateral constraints; asset prices;

    JEL classification:

    • D52 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Incomplete Markets
    • D53 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Financial Markets
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2015-03. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Stephen Sheppard). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/edwilus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.