IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/vua/wpaper/2003-26.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Job search, search intensity and labour market transitions : an empirical analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Bloemen, Hans G.

    (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Faculteit der Economische Wetenschappen en Econometrie (Free University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics Sciences, Business Administration and Economitrics)

Abstract

In this paper we present an empirical structural job search model with endogenously determined search intensity. The model describes both the behaviour of unemployed job searchers and on-the-job search. We use data on various indicators (or search channels) for the intensity of search, like the monthly number of applications, to study the influence of the intensity of search on labour market transitions. The estimation results give us insight in the effectiveness of search. The impact of the benefit level on search intensity of unemployed job searchers is quantified. Moreover, the estimation results are used to gain insight in the "discouraged worker" effect. The generalized residuals are studied to discuss the fit of the model.

Suggested Citation

  • Bloemen, Hans G., 2003. "Job search, search intensity and labour market transitions : an empirical analysis," Serie Research Memoranda 0026, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vua:wpaper:2003-26
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://degree.ubvu.vu.nl/repec/vua/wpaper/pdf/20030026.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gerard J. van den Berg & Bas van der Klaauw, 2006. "Counseling And Monitoring Of Unemployed Workers: Theory And Evidence From A Controlled Social Experiment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(3), pages 895-936, August.
    2. Mortensen, D. T. & Vishwanath, T., 1995. "Personal contacts and earnings: It is who you know!," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 103-104, March.
    3. Borsch-Supan, Axel & Hajivassiliou, Vassilis A., 1993. "Smooth unbiased multivariate probability simulators for maximum likelihood estimation of limited dependent variable models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 347-368, August.
    4. Yoon, Bong Joon, 1981. "A Model of Unemployment Duration with Variable Search Intensity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(4), pages 599-609, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bart Cockx & Muriel Dejemeppe & Andrey Launov & Bruno Van der Linden, 2018. "Imperfect Monitoring of Job Search: Structural Estimation and Policy Design," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(1), pages 75-120.
    2. Ping Yan, 2013. "How much do Workers Search?," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(1), pages 249-276, May.
    3. Bart COCKX & Muriel DEJEMEPPE & Andrey LAUNOV & Bruno VAN DER LINDEN, 2011. "Monitoring, Sanctions and Front-Loading of Job Search in a Non-Stationary Model," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2011042, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    4. Pieter A. Gautier & Jose Luis Moraga-Gonzalez & Ronald P. Wolthoff, 2007. "Structural Estimation of Search Intensity: Do Non-Employed Workers Search Enough?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 07-071/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    5. Philip Oreopoulos & Till von Wachter & Andrew Heisz, 2012. "The Short- and Long-Term Career Effects of Graduating in a Recession," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(1), pages 1-29, January.
    6. Hans G. Bloemen, 2016. "Private wealth and job exit at older age: a random effects model," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(2), pages 763-807, September.
    7. Thomas Huizen & Janneke Plantenga, 2014. "Job Search Behaviour and Time Preferences: Testing Exponential Versus Hyperbolic Discounting," De Economist, Springer, vol. 162(3), pages 223-245, September.
    8. T.M. van Huizen & J. Plantenga, 2013. "Job Search Behaviour and Time Preferences: Evidence from the Netherlands," Working Papers 13-03, Utrecht School of Economics.
    9. John K. Dagsvik & Tom Kornstad & Terje Skjerpen, 2016. "Discouraged worker effects and barriers against employment for immigrant and non-immigrant women," Discussion Papers 845, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    10. van Huizen, Thomas & Alessie, Rob, 2015. "Time preferences and career investments," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 77-92.
    11. Gautier, Pieter A. & Moraga-González, José L. & Wolthoff, Ronald P., 2016. "Search costs and efficiency: Do unemployed workers search enough?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 123-139.
    12. Kaas Leo, 2010. "Variable Search Intensity with Coordination Unemployment," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-33, October.
    13. Pieter Gautier & Jose Luis Moraga-Gonzalez & Ronald Wolthoff, 2007. "Structural Estimation of Search Intensity: Do non-employed workers search hard enough?," 2007 Meeting Papers 695, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    14. van Huizen, Thomas & Alessie, Rob, 2019. "Risk aversion and job mobility," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 91-106.
    15. Rajiv Garg & Rahul Telang, 2018. "To Be or Not to Be Linked: Online Social Networks and Job Search by Unemployed Workforce," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 64(8), pages 3926-3941, August.
    16. Jeremy Schwartz, 2019. "The Job Search Intensity Supply Curve: How Labor Market Conditions Affect Job Search Effort," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 45(2), pages 269-300, April.
    17. T.M. van Huizen & Rob Alessie, 2016. "Risk Aversion and Job Mobility," Working Papers 16-09, Utrecht School of Economics.
    18. John Dagsvik & Tom Kornstad & Terje Skjerpen, 2013. "Labor force participation and the discouraged worker effect," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 401-433, August.
    19. Furmanov, Kirill & Chernysheva, Irina, 2012. "Health and job search in Russia," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 26(2), pages 62-91.
    20. Marilyn Pease & Kyungmin Kim, 2014. "Costly Search with Adverse Selection: Solicitation Curse vs. Accelerating Blessing," 2014 Meeting Papers 816, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    21. Muriel Dejemeppe & Bruno Van der Linden & Andrey Launov & Bart Cockx, 2011. "Monitoring and Sanctions in a Non-Stationary Structural Job-Search Model," 2011 Meeting Papers 501, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    22. van der Klaauw, Bas & van Vuuren, Aico, 2010. "Job search and academic achievement," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 294-316, February.
    23. Jesper Bagger & Morten Henningsen, 2008. "Job Durations and the Job Search Model: A Two-Country, Multi-Sample Analysis," Discussion Papers 553, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    24. Stefano DellaVigna & Attila Lindner & Balázs Reizer & Johannes F. Schmieder, 2017. "Reference-Dependent Job Search: Evidence from Hungary," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 132(4), pages 1969-2018.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Fougère, Denis & Pradel, Jacqueline & Roger, Muriel, 2009. "Does the public employment service affect search effort and outcomes?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(7), pages 846-869, October.
    2. van den Berg, Gerard J, 1999. "Empirical Inference with Equilibrium Search Models of the Labour Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(456), pages 283-306, June.
    3. Chiara Mussida & Luca Zanin, 0. "Determinants of the Choice of Job Search Channels by the Unemployed Using a Multivariate Probit Model," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-52.
    4. Marco Caliendo & Ricarda Schmidl & Arne Uhlendorff, 2011. "Social networks, job search methods and reservation wages: evidence for Germany," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(7), pages 796-824, October.
    5. Chiara Mussida & Luca Zanin, 2020. "Determinants of the Choice of Job Search Channels by the Unemployed Using a Multivariate Probit Model," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 152(1), pages 369-420, November.
    6. Catia Nicodemo & Gustavo Adolfo García, 2015. "Job Search Channels, Neighborhood Effects, and Wages Inequality in Developing Countries: The Colombian Case," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 53(2), pages 75-99, June.
    7. Maleva, Tatiana (Малева, Татьяна) & Zubarevich, Natalya (Зубаревич, Наталья) & Lyashok, Victor (Ляшок, Виктор) & Lopatina, Marina (Лопатина, Марина), 2018. "The Russian Labor Market: The Impact of Crises [Российский Рынок Труда: Воздействие Кризисов]," Working Papers 041831, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
    8. Michael King, 2012. "The Unbanked Four-Fifths: Informality and Barriers to Financial Services in Nigeria," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp411, IIIS.
    9. Annette Bergemann & Marco Caliendo & Gerard J. van den Berg & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2011. "The threat effect of participation in active labor market programs on job search behavior of migrants in Germany," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(7), pages 777-795, October.
    10. Nicola Pavoni & G. L. Violante, 2007. "Optimal Welfare-to-Work Programs," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(1), pages 283-318.
    11. Michael Lechner & Ruth Miquel & Conny Wunsch, 2011. "Long‐Run Effects Of Public Sector Sponsored Training In West Germany," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 742-784, August.
    12. Jeff Borland, 2014. "Dealing with unemployment: What should be the role of labour market programs?," Evidence Base, Australia and New Zealand School of Government, vol. 2014(4), pages 1-21, December.
    13. Adnan Q. Khan & Steven F. Lehrer, 2013. "The Impact of Social Networks on Labour Market Outcomes: New Evidence from Cape Breton," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 39(s1), pages 1-24, May.
    14. Michael Gerfin & Michael Lechner, 2002. "A Microeconometric Evaluation of the Active Labour Market Policy in Switzerland," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 854-893, October.
    15. Yannis M. Ioannides & Vassilis A. Hajivassiliou, 2007. "Unemployment and liquidity constraints," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 479-510.
    16. Shawn Ni & Michael Podgursky, 2016. "How Teachers Respond to Pension System Incentives: New Estimates and Policy Applications," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(4), pages 1075-1104.
    17. Bruno Crépon & Marc Gurgand & Thierry Kamionka & Laurent Lequien, 2013. "Is Counseling Welfare Recipients Cost-Effective ? Lessons from a Random Experiment," Working Papers 2013-01, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    18. Pierre Cahuc & François Fontaine, 2009. "On the Efficiency of Job Search with Social Networks," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 11(3), pages 411-439, June.
    19. Haaijer, Marinus E., 1996. "Predictions in conjoint choice experiments : the x-factor probit model," Research Report 96B22, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
    20. Michele Pellizzari, 2010. "Do Friends and Relatives Really Help in Getting a Good Job?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 63(3), pages 494-510, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    job search; duration models; estimation by simulation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:vua:wpaper:2003-26. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (R. Dam). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/fewvunl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.