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The Pay Parity Matrix A Toll For Analysing The Structure of Pay


  • Kenneth W Clements

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)

  • Izan H Y Izan

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)


This paper introduces a new tool for measuring relative pay within organisations, which we call the “pay parity (PP) matrix” and discusses its advantages and useful properties. The PP matrix allows us to conveniently measure, and draw inferences about, the nature of the whole remuneration schedule, such as its gradient and smoothness. We illustrate the application of the PP matrix by using data on the remuneration of academic executives. This tool has wider uses whenever matrix comparisons are involved.

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  • Kenneth W Clements & Izan H Y Izan, 2010. "The Pay Parity Matrix A Toll For Analysing The Structure of Pay," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 10-16, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:10-16

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