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Creating Productive Jobs in East European Transition Economies: A Synthesis of Firm-Level Studies

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Abstract

The challenge for labour market policy in the new member states and other transition economies of Eastern Europe has been to redress the sharp drops in employment and rises in unemployment in a way that fosters the creation of productive jobs. This paper first documents the magnitude and productivity of job and worker reallocation. It then investigates the effects of privatisation, product and labour market liberalisation, and obstacles to growth in the new private sector on reallocation and its productivity in Hungary, Romania, Russia, and Ukraine. We find that market reform has resulted in a large increase in the pace of job reallocation, particularly that occurring between sectors and via firm turnover. Unlike under central planning, the job reallocation during the transition has contributed significantly to aggregate productivity growth. Privatisation has not only stimulated intrasectoral job reallocation, but the reallocation is more productive than that among remaining state firms. The estimated effect of privatisation on firm productivity is usually positive, but it varies considerably across countries. The productivity gains from privatisation have generally not come at the expense of workers, but are associated rather with increased wages and employment.
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Suggested Citation

  • J. David Brown & John S. Earle & Scott G. Gellbach, "undated". "Creating Productive Jobs in East European Transition Economies: A Synthesis of Firm-Level Studies," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles jse2008, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:jse2008
    Note: Appears in National Institute Economic Review 204(1): 108-125
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    Cited by:

    1. Bah, El-hadj & Brada, Josef C. & Yigit, Taner, 2011. "With a little help from our friends: The effect of USAID assistance on SME growth in a transition economy," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 205-220, June.
    2. Erhardt, Eva, 2017. "Who persistently creates jobs? Absolute versus relative high-growth firms," MPRA Paper 79295, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Jens Kr├╝ger, 2014. "Intrasectoral structural change and aggregate productivity development: robust stochastic nonparametric frontier function estimates," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(4), pages 1545-1572, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    transition economies; job creation; firm-level data;

    JEL classification:

    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

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