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Partnership with Partial Commitment



This paper derives the Nash-equilibrium degrees of commitment to a partnership where lack of full commitment fuels suspicion and increases potential losses for partners.

Suggested Citation

  • Levy, Amnon, 2006. "Partnership with Partial Commitment," Economics Working Papers wp06-05, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:uow:depec1:wp06-05

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jayant Menon, 1994. "Trade Liberalization and Intra-Industry Specialization: The Australian Experience," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-107, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    2. Zivot, Eric & Andrews, Donald W K, 2002. "Further Evidence on the Great Crash, the Oil-Price Shock, and the Unit-Root Hypothesis," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 25-44, January.
    3. Kocenda, Evzen, 2005. "Beware of breaks in exchange rates: Evidence from European transition countries," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 307-324, September.
    4. Mosayeb Pahlavani & Abbas Valadkhani & Andrew C. Worthington, 2005. "The impact of financial deregulation on monetary aggregates and interest rates in Australia," Applied Financial Economics Letters, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 1(3), pages 157-163, May.
    5. Robin L. Lumsdaine & David H. Papell, 1997. "Multiple Trend Breaks And The Unit-Root Hypothesis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(2), pages 212-218, May.
    6. Amelia Santos-Paulino & A. P. Thirlwall, 2004. "The impact of trade liberalisation on exports, imports and the balance of payments of developing countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(493), pages 50-72, February.
    7. Rolf Färe & Shawna Grosskopf & Dimitri Margaritis, 2001. "Productivity Trends in Australian and New Zealand Manufacturing," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 34(2), pages 125-134.
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    More about this item


    Structural break; unit root test; Lebanon economy;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General

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