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Works Councils: Lessons from Europe for Australia



Any discussion of the viability of works councils in the Australian context needs to examine their operation in Europe, where they have a reasonably substantial history and have become an established part of the industrial relation infrastructure. In recent years, works councils have also expanded their reach in Europe, as a result of national and supranational (European Union) initiatives. Reference to a European form of works councils, however, may hide marked differences in the structure and operations of works councils between different west European countries. This article begins by examining in some detail the diverse European experience of works councils. Based on that experience, it then explores the potential advantages of works councils in the Australian context, and the most appropriate form that they should take.

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  • Knudsen, H. & Markey, R., 2001. "Works Councils: Lessons from Europe for Australia," Economics Working Papers wp01-14, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:uow:depec1:wp01-14

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Johansson, Helena & Nilsson, Lars, 1997. "Export processing zones as catalysts," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(12), pages 2115-2128, December.
    2. Willmore, Larry, 1995. "Export processing zones in the Dominican Republic: A comment on Kaplinsky," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 529-535, March.
    3. K. Jayanthakumaran & John Weiss, 1997. "Export Processing Zones in Sri Lanka: A Cost-Benefit Appraisal," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(5), pages 727-737.
    4. Warr, Peter G, 1989. "Export Processing Zones: The Economics of Enclave Manufacturing," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 4(1), pages 65-88, January.
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    trade unions; cooperation; consultation; perceptions;

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