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Impact of the Global Economic Crises on Civil Society Organizations


  • Eva-Maria Hanfstaengl


The food, environmental and economic crises have challenged civil society organizations (CSOs) and the communities they serve. A broad-based survey, initiated by the United Nations Division for Social Policy and Development and guided by a Civil Society Steering Committee, was undertaken in 2009 that measured the impact of the crises on the operating capacity of CSOs around the world and their expectations as they look ahead. This study examines the current situation of CSOs as indicated by responses from 640 civil society organizations worldwide. It also asks what strategies they are undertaking to cope with a drop of revenues and how to strengthen social-service delivery capacities of CSOs during crisis periods.

Suggested Citation

  • Eva-Maria Hanfstaengl, 2010. "Impact of the Global Economic Crises on Civil Society Organizations," Working Papers 97, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
  • Handle: RePEc:une:wpaper:97

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chichilnisky, Graciela & Heal, Geoffrey, 1994. "Who should abate carbon emissions? : An international viewpoint," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 443-449, April.
    2. Klaus Keller & Zili Yang & Matt Hall & David F. Bradford, 2003. "Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: When And How Much?," Working Papers 108, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
    3. Ackerman, Frank & Stanton, Elizabeth A. & Bueno, Ramón, 2010. "Fat tails, exponents, extreme uncertainty: Simulating catastrophe in DICE," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(8), pages 1657-1665, June.
    4. repec:pri:cepsud:94bradford is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Kristen A. Sheeran, 2006. "Who Should Abate Carbon Emissions? A Note," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 35(2), pages 89-98, October.
    6. Cooter, Robert & Rappoport, Peter, 1984. "Were the Ordinalists Wrong about Welfare Economics?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 22(2), pages 507-530, June.
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    More about this item


    Civil Society Organizations; financial crisis; official development assistance; innovative sources of financing; international coordination;

    JEL classification:

    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations
    • Z00 - Other Special Topics - - General - - - General
    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid

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