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Football Betting As A Cyclical Learning Process


  • Francesc Pujol

    (ESI, Economics Sport and Intangibles research group, Department of Economics, University of Navarra)


Based on the well established result of probability matching, we explore in this paper to what extent soccer bettors adjust their behavior taking into account the new relevant information provided by the market. We test empirically the existence of a learning process using the Quiniela bettors performance, the Spanish soccer betting game, for the period 1970-2000. Empirical results suggest that there is a progressive improvement in the bettors' performance attributable to the learning process. The other remaining explanatory variables follow the expected behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesc Pujol, 2009. "Football Betting As A Cyclical Learning Process," Faculty Working Papers 05/09, School of Economics and Business Administration, University of Navarra.
  • Handle: RePEc:una:unccee:wp0509

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. David Forrest, 2014. "Football and betting," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Professional Football, chapter 23, pages 383-400 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item


    betting market; learning process; soccer; Quiniela;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty


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