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Low-Income and Welfare Client Priorities: Patterns of Earnings and Welfare Receipt for Workforce Investment Act Participants

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Abstract

This paper examines labor market and welfare experiences of participants in Workforce Investment Act (WIA) programs who exited in July 2000-June 2001. Administrative data from six states on earnings and welfare receipt are used to trace the experiences of participants in the two years prior to and in the year following exit from WIA. Individuals are classified as Adults or Dislocated Workers and by whether they received Training or less intensive services under WIA. We find that Adults have large employment gains associated with participation in WIA, and Adults in Training have particularly large earnings gains. Following losses, employment and earnings of Dislocated Workers largely recover following WIA participation. Welfare receipt declines, especially for those in Training activities. Despite some differences, similarities between states in basic patterns are striking.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter R. Mueser & David W. Stevens, 2003. "Low-Income and Welfare Client Priorities: Patterns of Earnings and Welfare Receipt for Workforce Investment Act Participants," Working Papers 0313, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
  • Handle: RePEc:umc:wpaper:0313
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    File URL: https://economics.missouri.edu/working-papers/2003/wp0313_mueser-stevens.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Erin Todd Bronchetti & Melissa McInerney, 2017. "Does Increased Access to Health Insurance Impact Claims for Workers' Compensation? Evidence from Massachusetts Health Care Reform," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 17-277, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    2. Coleen K. Chrisinger, 2017. "Veterans in Workforce Development: Participation and Labor Market Outcomes," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 17-274, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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