IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/uma/periwp/wp224.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Proximity of High Volume Developmental Neurotoxin Polluters to Schools: Vulnerable Populations at Risk

Author

Listed:
  • Cristina Legot
  • Bruce London
  • John Shandra

Abstract

A substantial amount of environmental justice research has taken the form of “proximity studies” that analyze the race and class composition of populations living in close proximity to general sources of pollution. Such studies often find disproportionate minority, poverty, and low-income populations proximate to the pollution source. This proximity study has a different starting point. We begin by locating nearly 700 of the nation’s highest volume polluters of specific toxins that put children’s health and learning abilities at risk: developmental neurotoxins. We then examine (a) the numbers of schools and children located within two miles of each polluter, and (b) the race and class compositions of the populations within two miles. The result is a study of the proximity of vulnerable populations to pollution that highlights the vulnerability of children, not just that of minorities and the poor. We find thousands of schools and hundreds of thousands of children at risk. We also find that a substantial proportion of the high volume polluters studied are surrounded by disproportionate minority, poverty, and low-income populations.

Suggested Citation

  • Cristina Legot & Bruce London & John Shandra, 2010. "The Proximity of High Volume Developmental Neurotoxin Polluters to Schools: Vulnerable Populations at Risk," Working Papers wp224, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  • Handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp224
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.peri.umass.edu/fileadmin/pdf/working_papers/working_papers_201-250/WP224.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Victor Nee, 2000. "The Role of the State in Making a Market Economy," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 156(1), pages 1-64, March.
    2. Campos, Nauro F. & Nugent, Jeffrey B., 1999. "Development Performance and the Institutions of Governance: Evidence from East Asia and Latin America," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 439-452, March.
    3. de Melo, Martha & Denizer, Cevdet & Gelb, Alan & Tenev, Stoyan, 1997. "Circumstance and choice : the role of initial conditions and policies in transition economies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1866, The World Bank.
    4. David Stuckler & Lawrence King & Greg Patton, 2009. "The Social Construction of Successful Market Reforms," Working Papers wp199, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    5. Sergio Godoy & Joseph Stiglitz, 2006. "Growth, Initial Conditions, Law and Speed of Privatization in Transition Countries: 11 Years Later," NBER Working Papers 11992, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Maxim Boycko & Marek Dabrowski & Rudiger Dornbusch & Richard Layard & Andrei Shleifer, 1993. "Post-Communist Reform: Pain and Progress," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262023628, January.
    7. Vladimir Popov, 2000. "Shock Therapy Versus Gradualism: The End Of The Debate (Explaining The Magnitude Of Transformational Recession)," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 42(1), pages 1-57, April.
    8. Burawoy, Michael, 1996. "The state and economic involution: Russia through a China lens," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 1105-1117, June.
    9. Yingqi A. Wei & V. N. Balasubramanyam (ed.), 2004. "Foreign Direct Investment," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3169, September.
    10. John King, 2011. "Foreign Direct Investment and Pollution Havens," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, pages 39-47.
    11. de Melo, Martha & Denizer, Cevdet & Gelb, Alan, 1996. "From plan to market : patterns of transition," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1564, The World Bank.
    12. John Bennett & Saul Estrin & Giovanni Urga, 2007. "Methods of privatization and economic growth in transition economies," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 15, pages 661-683, October.
    13. Stanley Fischer & Alan Gelb, 1991. "The Process of Socialist Economic Transformation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 91-105.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    proximity studies; environmental inequality; developmental toxins; neurotoxins; high-volume polluters; vulnerable populations: race and class; schools and children;

    JEL classification:

    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other
    • I29 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Other
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp224. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Judy Fogg). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/permaus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.