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Inequidades socioeconómicas en el uso de servicios sanitarios del adulto mayor montevideano


  • Ana Inés Balsa

    () (Departamento de Economía, Universidad de Montevideo; Health Economics Research Group, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA)

  • Daniel Ferrés

    () (Departamento de Economía, Universidad de Montevideo)

  • Máximo Rossi

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Patricia Triunfo

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)


The aim of this work is to analyse the socio-economic associated inequity in the use of health care services among older adults in Montevideo, capital city of Uruguay, based on data from the SABE survey in the years 1999-2000. We impute the equivalent household income through the use of the ECH (Household Continuous Survey) of the Statistics National Institute (INE). Considering a wide range of access, quality, and use of health care services indicators, we attempt to reduce the probable biases that arise from the fact that morbidity and use of health care services variables are measured contemporaneously. Also, we correct for the potential endogeneity of income and health by the use of Instrumental Variables. After the standardization of the use of services by necessity, we find horizontal inequity favouring the older adults with a higher socio-economic level, in the quality of access to the medical consultation (time to arrival and time to being attended), in the probability of having had a consultation in the last four and twelve months, and in the use of preventive services (mammography, Papanicolau, and prostate examination). The latter, show the higher levels of inequity. Through the Instrumental Variable analysis we deduce that inequity would be underestimated if endogeneity is not corrected for.

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  • Ana Inés Balsa & Daniel Ferrés & Máximo Rossi & Patricia Triunfo, 2007. "Inequidades socioeconómicas en el uso de servicios sanitarios del adulto mayor montevideano," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1307, Department of Economics - dECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:1307

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    Cited by:

    1. Hernández-Villafuerte, Karla, 2014. "El adulto mayor y la universalidad de la salud: Análisis de desigualdad basado en una comparación entre los diferentes grupos de edad/The Elderly and the Universality of Health: An Inequality Analysis," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 32, pages 1073-1096, Septiembr.

    More about this item


    health inequity; concentration indexes; older adults;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other

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