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Child Well-being in Japan: The high cost of economic success


  • Martha N. Ozawa
  • Shigemi Kono


This Innocenti Occasional Paper examines the counter-intuitive relationship between Japan’s continuing economic achievement and the good of its child population. Although child physical health and school attainment statistics have never looked better, changes in the structure of the family are having a worrying impact upon the collective psychological well-being of young Japanese. Adults and the elderly are harvesting the greater share of the benefits of economic success; the country’s children are missing out.

Suggested Citation

  • Martha N. Ozawa & Shigemi Kono, 1995. "Child Well-being in Japan: The high cost of economic success," Papers iopeps95/27, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:iopeps:iopeps95/27

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Sheldon Danziger & Peter Gottschalk, 1989. "Increasing Inequality in the United States: What We Know and What We Don’t," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 174-195, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aline Coudouel & John Micklewright & Sheila Marnie, 1998. "Targeting Social Assistance in a Transition Economy: the Mahallas in Uzbekistan," Papers iopeps98/4, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    2. Cathal O’Donoghue & Holly Sutherland, 1998. "Accounting for the Family: The treatment of marriage and children in European income tax systems," Papers iopeps98/25, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    3. Mel Ainscow & Memmenasha Haile-Giorgis, 1998. "The Education of Children with Special Needs: Barriers and opportunities in Central and Eastern Europe," Papers iopeps98/1, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    4. Olga Cantó Sanchez & Magda Mercader-Prats, 1998. "Child Poverty in Spain: What can be said?," Papers iopeps98/24, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.

    More about this item


    child welfare; family structure; health statistics; school attendance;

    JEL classification:

    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs


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