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The Situation among Children of Migrant Origin in Germany


  • Susanne Clauss
  • Bernhard Nauck


Special Series on the Situation of Children in Immigrant Families in Affluent Societies Germany may be described as a country of immigrants. Resident foreign citizens alone number around 6.7 million. The share of children who are living with parents who are recent immigrants is quite large. More than 1 million children 0–17 years of age are foreign citizens. Counting German citizens, there are nearly 6 million children of migrant origin under the age of 25. Of all persons of migrant origin, nearly 30 per cent are in the 0–20 age group.

Suggested Citation

  • Susanne Clauss & Bernhard Nauck, 2009. "The Situation among Children of Migrant Origin in Germany," Papers inwopa575, Innocenti Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa575

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. David Card & John DiNardo & Eugena Estes, 2000. "The More Things Change: Immigrants and the Children of Immigrants in the 1940s, the 1970s, and the 1990s," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in the Economics of Immigration, pages 227-270 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    3. Constant, Amelie & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2005. "Immigrant Performance and Selective Immigration Policy: A European Perspective," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 94-105.
    4. David Card, 2005. "Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 300-323, November.
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    7. Borjas, George J, 1993. "The Intergenerational Mobility of Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 113-135, January.
    8. Hazel Christie, 2007. "Higher Education and Spatial (Im)Mobility: Nontraditional Students and Living at Home," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 39(10), pages 2445-2463, October.
    9. Broecke, Stijn & Hamed, Joseph, 2008. "Gender gaps in higher education participation: An analysis of the relationship between prior attainment and young participation by gender, socio-economic class and ethnicity," MPRA Paper 35595, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. D.H. Blackaby & D.G. Leslie & P.D. Murphy, 2002. "White-ethnic minority earnings and employment differentials in Britain: evidence from the LFS," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(2), pages 270-297, April.
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    12. Clark, Ken & Lindley, Joanne, 2006. "Immigrant Labour Market Assimilation and Arrival Effects: Evidence from the UK Labour Force Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 2228, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. M. A. Shields & S. Wheatley Price, 2001. "Language fluency and immigrant employment prospects: evidence from Britain's ethnic minorities," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(11), pages 741-745.
    14. Stephen Wheatley Price, 2001. "The unemployment experience of male immigrants in England," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 201-215.
    15. Michael Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, 1998. "The earnings of male immigrants in England: evidence from the quarterly LFS," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(9), pages 1157-1168.
    16. Stuart Cameron, 2000. "Ethnic minority housing needs and diversity in an area of low housing demand," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 32(8), pages 1427-1444, August.
    17. Steve Bradley & Pam Lenton, 2007. "Dropping out of post-compulsory education in the UK: an analysis of determinants and outcomes," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(2), pages 299-328, April.
    18. Chiswick, Barry R, 1980. "The Earnings of White and Coloured Male Immigrants in Britain," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 47(185), pages 81-87, February.
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    More about this item


    child poverty; discrimination; education; health; immigration; migrant children; migrant families; migration policy; rights of minority children;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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