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Making Philippine Cities Child Friendly: Voices of children in poor communities

Author

Listed:
  • Mary Racelis
  • Angela Desiree M. Aguirre
  • Liane Pena-Alampay
  • Felisa U. Etemadi
  • Teresa Banaynal Fernandez
  • Rosemarie Matias Fernandez
  • Marita Castro Guevara
  • silvio garatini
  • Ching Li Ye
  • Eunice Anne M. Enriquez
  • Careza P. Reyes
  • Institute of Philippine Culture

Abstract

The study analyses how the Philippines’ national Child Friendly Movement, which has engaged government, NGOs, civil society, children and UNICEF, has enhanced the capacity of local governments, communities and young people to fulfil the rights of the poorest children. The study uses participatory methodologies and reflects the viewpoint of children and the community. It reveals that in areas where the Child Friendly Cities strategy was adopted, greater attention is paid to the most excluded and vulnerable groups and interventions are developed on a wider spectrum of children’s rights. Beyond providing insights on concrete ways in which child rights are bring promoted at local level, it provides recommendations on how the fulfilment of child rights can be further enhanced by municipal governments.

Suggested Citation

  • Mary Racelis & Angela Desiree M. Aguirre & Liane Pena-Alampay & Felisa U. Etemadi & Teresa Banaynal Fernandez & Rosemarie Matias Fernandez & Marita Castro Guevara & silvio garatini & Ching Li Ye & Eun, 2006. "Making Philippine Cities Child Friendly: Voices of children in poor communities," Papers innins06/25, Innocenti Insights.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:innins:innins06/25
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarrarán & Santiago Cueto & Ana Santiago & Eugenio Severín, 2017. "Technology and Child Development: Evidence from the One Laptop per Child Program," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, pages 295-320.
    2. Ana Balsa & Nestor Gandelman & Rafael Porzecanski, 2010. "The Impact of ICT on Adolescents' Perceptions and Consumption of Substances," Research Department Publications 4692, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    3. Paul Carrillo & Mercedes Onofa & Juan Ponce, 2011. "Information Technology and Student Achievement: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Ecuador," Research Department Publications 4698, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    4. Dorothea Kleine, 2010. "ICT4WHAT?-Using the choice framework to operationalise the capability approach to development," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(5), pages 674-692.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child poverty; child-friendly cities; children's rights; urban children; urban poor;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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