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Skill-Upgrading and the Saving of Immigrants

  • Adolfo Cristobal-Campoamor

    ()

    (International School of Economics at Tbilisi State University )

This note derives positive implications about the effect of immigration on labor income and the skill composition of the labor force in receiving economies. The novel mechanism through which immigration affects labor-market outcomes is the availability of new loanable funds for human-capital investment, which results in endogenous skill upgrading. Given their higher training costs in the host economy, immigrants usually do not acquire advanced academic skills, and they accordingly skip the financial costs of education at the college level. As a result, they self-select as net lenders, which reduces the equilibrium interest rates and facilitates the upgrading mostly of new generations of natives. Consequently, the aggregate labor income of natives increases with immigration.

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File URL: http://www.iset.ge/files/009-08.pdf
File Function: First version, 2008
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Paper provided by International School of Economics at TSU, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia in its series Working Papers with number 009-08.

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Length: 15 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tbs:wpaper:08-009
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.iset.ge/

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  1. Malcolm J. Macmillen, 1982. "The Economic Effects of International Migration: A Survey," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(3), pages 245-267, 03.
  2. Galor, Oded & Zeira, Joseph, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52, January.
  3. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 9755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Djajic, Slobodan, 1989. "Migrants in a guest-worker system : A utility maximizing approach," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 327-339, October.
  5. Galor, Oded & Stark, Oded, 1990. "Migrants' Savings, the Probability of Return Migration and Migrants' Performance," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 31(2), pages 463-67, May.
  6. Giovanni Peri & Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, 2005. "Rethinking the Gains from Immigration: Theory and Evidence from the U.S," Working Papers 58, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  7. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economic Benefits from Immigration," NBER Working Papers 4955, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Rigolini, Jamele, 2004. "Education technologies, wages and technological progress," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 55-77, October.
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