IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ssa/lemwps/2014-09.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Propagation of Economic Shocks in Input-Output Networks: A Cross-Country Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Martha G. Alatriste Contreras
  • Giorgio Fagiolo

Abstract

This paper investigates how economic shocks propagate and amplify through the input-output network connecting industrial sectors in developed economies. We study alternative models of diffusion on networks and we calibrate them using input-output data on real-world inter-sectoral dependencies for several European countries before the Great Depression. We show that the impact of economic shocks strongly depends on the nature of the shock and country size. Shocks that impact on final demand without changing production and the technological relationships between sectors have on average a large but very homogeneous impact on the economy. Conversely, when shocks change also the magnitudes of input-output across-sector interdependencies (and possibly sector production), the economy is subject to predominantly large but more heterogeneous avalanche sizes. In this case, we also find that: (i) the more a sector is globally central in the country network, the largest its impact; (ii) the largest European countries, such as those constituting the core of the European Union's economy, typically experience the largest avalanches, signaling their intrinsic higher vulnerability to economic shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Martha G. Alatriste Contreras & Giorgio Fagiolo, 2014. "Propagation of Economic Shocks in Input-Output Networks: A Cross-Country Analysis," LEM Papers Series 2014/09, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssa:lemwps:2014/09
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.lem.sssup.it/WPLem/files/2014-09.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:phsmap:v:488:y:2017:i:c:p:187-204 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:spr:jeicoo:v:12:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11403-015-0171-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Martha Alatriste-Contreras, 2015. "The relationship between the key sectors in the european union economy and the intra-European Union trade," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 4(1), pages 1-24, December.
    4. Chopra, Shauhrat S. & Khanna, Vikas, 2015. "Interconnectedness and interdependencies of critical infrastructures in the US economy: Implications for resilience," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 436(C), pages 865-877.
    5. Xing, Lizhi & Dong, Xianlei & Guan, Jun, 2017. "Global industrial impact coefficient based on random walk process and inter-country input–output table," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 471(C), pages 576-591.
    6. Charles D. Brummitt & Kenan Huremovic & Paolo Pin & Matthew H. Bonds & Fernando Vega-Redondo, 2017. "Contagious disruptions and complexity traps in economic development," Papers 1707.05914, arXiv.org.
    7. Alexei P Kireyev & Andrei Leonidov, 2016. "China’s Imports Slowdown; Spillovers, Spillins, and Spillbacks," IMF Working Papers 16/51, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Alper Duman & Gül Ertan Özgüzer, 2015. "Input-Output Networks and Growth Performances across Countries," Working Papers 1504, Izmir University of Economics.
    9. Rebekka Burkholz & Hans J. Herrmann & Frank Schweitzer, 2018. "Explicit size distributions of failure cascades redefine systemic risk on finite networks," Papers 1802.03286, arXiv.org.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Complex networks; input-output networks; shock diusion; spreading mechanisms; avalances; economic crises;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ssa:lemwps:2014/09. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/labssit.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.