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A comment on hollander on Sraffa and the 'Marxian dimension'

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  • Antonella Stirati

Abstract

The contribution by Professor Hollander (2000) discusses Marx's influence on Sraffa's thought. While enquiries into this matter certainly have a historical and biographical interest, the paper steps beyond this kind of interest. In fact, in this article, Professor Hollander maintains that this influence caused a bias in Sraffa's interpretation of Ricardo (pp.192-97).1 However, such a claim on Professor Hollander’s part requires a demonstration that Sraffa’s conclusions were indeed led astray by the alleged influence.2 This is therefore the central question, and will be taken up in the present comment. Only in the conclusion will I touch briefly on the question of whether the claim of a Marxian influence on Sraffa’s interpretation of Ricardo is indeed correct from a biographical and historical point of view.

Suggested Citation

  • Antonella Stirati, 2010. "A comment on hollander on Sraffa and the 'Marxian dimension'," Departmental Working Papers of Economics - University 'Roma Tre' 0117, Department of Economics - University Roma Tre.
  • Handle: RePEc:rtr:wpaper:0117
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Feenstra, Robert C., 1995. "Estimating the effects of trade policy," Handbook of International Economics,in: G. M. Grossman & K. Rogoff (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1553-1595 Elsevier.
    4. O'Rourke, Kevin H, 2000. "Tariffs and Growth in the Late 19th Century," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(463), pages 456-483, April.
    5. Andrew Rose, 2005. "Does the WTO Make Trade More Stable?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 7-22, January.
    6. Harrigan, James, 1993. "OECD imports and trade barriers in 1983," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1-2), pages 91-111, August.
    7. Jakob B. Madsen, 2001. "Trade Barriers and the Collapse of World Trade During the Great Depression," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 67(4), pages 848-868, April.
    8. Engle, Robert & Granger, Clive, 2015. "Co-integration and error correction: Representation, estimation, and testing," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 39(3), pages 106-135.
    9. Goldstein, Morris & Khan, Mohsin S., 1985. "Income and price effects in foreign trade," Handbook of International Economics,in: R. W. Jones & P. B. Kenen (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 20, pages 1041-1105 Elsevier.
    10. Nenci Silvia & Pietrobelli Carlo, 2008. "Does Tariff Liberalization Promote Trade? Latin American Countries in the Long-Run (1900-2000)," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 8(4), pages 1-30, December.
    11. Subramanian, Arvind & Wei, Shang-Jin, 2007. "The WTO promotes trade, strongly but unevenly," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 151-175, May.
    12. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 170-192.
    13. Douglas A. Irwin, 1993. "The GATT's contribution to economic recovery in post-war Western Europe," International Finance Discussion Papers 442, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    14. Andrew K. Rose, 2004. "Do We Really Know That the WTO Increases Trade?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 98-114, March.
    15. Rose, Andrew K., 2004. "Do WTO members have more liberal trade policy?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 209-235.
    16. Nasiruddin Ahmed, 2000. "Export response to trade liberalization in Bangladesh: a cointegration analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(8), pages 1077-1084.
    17. Richard E. Baldwin & Philippe Martin, 1999. "Two Waves of Globalisation: Superficial Similarities, Fundamental Differences," NBER Working Papers 6904, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. John H. Coatsworth & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2002. "The Roots of Latin American Protectionism: Looking Before the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 8999, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Michael A. Clemens & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2001. "A Tariff-Growth Paradox? Protection's Impact the World Around 1875-1997," NBER Working Papers 8459, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    22. Leith, James Clark & Reuber, Grant L, 1969. "The Impact of the Industrial Countries' Tariff Structure on Their Imports of Manufactures from Less-Developed Areas: A Comment," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 36(141), pages 75-80, February.
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    Keywords

    economic thought; David Ricardo; Piero Sraffa;

    JEL classification:

    • B10 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925 - - - General
    • B12 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925 - - - Classical (includes Adam Smith)
    • B24 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Socialist; Marxist; Scraffian

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