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An Economical Business-Cycle Model

  • Emmanuel Saez

    (UC Berkeley)

  • Pascal Michaillat

    (London School of Economics)

We construct a microfounded, dynamic version of the IS-LM-Phillips curve model by adding two elements to the money-in-the-utility-function model of Sidrauski (1967). First, real wealth enters the utility function. The resulting Euler equation describes consumption as a decreasing function of the interest rate in steady state–the IS curve. The demand for real money balances describes consumption as an increasing function of the interest rate in steady state–the LM curve. The intersection of the IS and LM curves defines the aggregate demand (AD) curve. Second, matching frictions in the labor market create unemployment. The aggregate supply (AS) curve describes output sold for a given market tightness. Tightness adjusts to equalize AD and AS curve for any price process. With a rigid price process, this steady-state equilibrium captures Keynesian intuitions. Demand and supply shocks affect tightness, unemployment, consumption, and output. Monetary policy affects aggregate demand and can be used for stabilization. Monetary policy is ineffective in a liquidity trap with zero nominal interest rate. In contrast, with a flexible price process, aggregate demand and monetary policy are irrelevant when the nominal interest rate is positive. In a liquidity trap, monetary policy is useful if it can increase inflation. We discuss equilibrium dynamics under a Phillips curve describing the slow adjustment of prices to their flexible level in the long run.

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2014 Meeting Papers with number 105.

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Date of creation: 2014
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed014:105
Contact details of provider: Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Christian Zimmermann Economic Research Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis PO Box 442 St. Louis MO 63166-0442 USA
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  1. Gauti B. Eggertsson, 2011. "What Fiscal Policy is Effective at Zero Interest Rates?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2010, Volume 25, pages 59-112 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. N. Gregory Mankiw & Ricardo Reis, 2002. "Sticky Information Versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal To Replace The New Keynesian Phillips Curve," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1295-1328, November.
  3. Gauti B. Eggertsson & Paul Krugman, 2012. "Debt, Deleveraging, and the Liquidity Trap: A Fisher-Minsky-Koo Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(3), pages 1469-1513.
  4. Sandeep Mazumder & Laurence M. Ball, 2011. "Inflation Dynamics and the Great Recession," IMF Working Papers 11/121, International Monetary Fund.
  5. Pascal Michaillat & Emmanuel Saez, 2013. "Aggregate Demand, Idle Time, and Unemployment," NBER Working Papers 18826, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Michaillat, Pascal & Saez, Emmanuel, 2013. "A Model of Aggregate Demand and Unemployment," CEPR Discussion Papers 9609, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Heng-fu Zou, 1998. "The spirit of capitalism, social status, money, and accumulation," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 68(3), pages 219-233, October.
  8. Pascal Michaillat, 2010. "Do Matching Frictions Explain Unemployment? Not in Bad Times," CEP Discussion Papers dp1024, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  9. N. Gregory Mankiw & Matthew weinzierl, 2011. "An Exploration of Optimal Stabilization Policy," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 42(1 (Spring), pages 209-272.
  10. Barro, Robert J., 1974. "Are Government Bonds Net Wealth?," Scholarly Articles 3451399, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  11. James Tobin, 1993. "Price Flexibility and Output Stability: An Old Keynesian View," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 45-65, Winter.
  12. Hosios, Arthur J, 1990. "On the Efficiency of Matching and Related Models of Search and Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(2), pages 279-98, April.
  13. Heng-fu Zou, 1995. "The spirit of capitalism and savings behavior," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 131-143, September.
  14. Rotemberg, Julio J., 2005. "Customer anger at price increases, changes in the frequency of price adjustment and monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(4), pages 829-852, May.
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