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Labor Supply and Frictions over the Business Cycle


  • Toshihiko Mukoyama

    (University of Virginia)

  • Richard Rogerson

    (Princeton University)

  • Aysegul Sahin

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Per Krusell



This paper analyzes a business cycle model with labor market frictions as well as an extensive labor supply margin. There are exogenous aggregate shocks to productivity, the job finding rate, and the separation rate. Workers also face idiosyncratic productivity (wage) shocks that they cannot insure against directly. The calibrated model reproduces the cyclical properties of employment, unemployment, and labor force participation. Moreover, it delivers aggregate flows across the three worker states - employed, unemployed, and not in the labor force - that are broadly consistent both with the long-run and the cyclical properties of the data. We assess the importance of each individual shock in accounting for various cyclical properties of the labor market. Though the approach taken here leaves open what causes the aggregate shocks, it emphasizes that the data can be successfully replicated with a rather standard-looking model as long as it features both the labor supply channel and the frictional channel.

Suggested Citation

  • Toshihiko Mukoyama & Richard Rogerson & Aysegul Sahin & Per Krusell, 2011. "Labor Supply and Frictions over the Business Cycle," 2011 Meeting Papers 100, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed011:100

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Timothy Besley & Torsten Persson, 2009. "The Origins of State Capacity: Property Rights, Taxation, and Politics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(4), pages 1218-1244, September.
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    4. Daron Acemoglu & James A. Robinson, 2000. "Why Did the West Extend the Franchise? Democracy, Inequality, and Growth in Historical Perspective," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1167-1199.
    5. Acemoglu, Daron, 2005. "Politics and economics in weak and strong states," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(7), pages 1199-1226, October.
    6. Daron Acemoglu & James A. Robinson, 2008. "Persistence of Power, Elites, and Institutions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(1), pages 267-293, March.
    7. Acemoglu,Daron & Robinson,James A., 2009. "Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521671422, March.
    8. Ling Shen, 2007. "When will a Dictator be Good?," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 31(2), pages 343-366, May.
    9. Arghya Ghosh & Peter Robertson, 2012. "Trade and expropriation," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 50(1), pages 169-191, May.
    10. Erwan Quintin, 2008. "Contract enforcement and the size of the informal economy," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 37(3), pages 395-416, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Haefke, Christian & Reiter, Michael, 2011. "What Do Participation Fluctuations Tell Us About Labor Supply Elasticities?," IZA Discussion Papers 6039, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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