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OptimalPatent Policy with Recurrent Innovators


  • Hugo Hopenhayn


  • Matthew Mitchell

    (University of Toronto)


We study an optimal patent problem in the spirit of Hopenhayn, et al (2006), but where all innovations arise from two repeated innovators. Following Hopenhayn, et al (2006) we divide patent regimes into those that are exclusive, in the sense that only one firm ever has a claim on the current market, and non-exclusive regimes where both firms simultaneously have ongoing claims to market leadership at a given instant. We show that in the exclusive regime, the long run treatment of the firms depends crucially on the investment technology: when it has no fixed costs, no firm is ever excluded, but with fixed costs one firm is excluded in finite time. We characterize non-exclusive regimes numerically and show that they may or may not lead to monopolization in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Hugo Hopenhayn & Matthew Mitchell, 2010. "OptimalPatent Policy with Recurrent Innovators," 2010 Meeting Papers 1313, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:1313

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    1. Craig Burnside & Martin Eichenbaum & Sergio Rebelo, 2016. "Understanding Booms and Busts in Housing Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1088-1147.
    2. Jack Favilukis & Sydney C. Ludvigson & Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, 2017. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Housing Wealth, Housing Finance, and Limited Risk Sharing in General Equilibrium," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 125(1), pages 140-223.
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    5. Nobuhiro Kiyotaki & Alexander Michaelides & Kalin Nikolov, 2011. "Winners and Losers in Housing Markets," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 255-296, March.
    6. Caplin, Andrew & Leahy, John, 2014. "A graph theoretic approach to markets for indivisible goods," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 112-122.
    7. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi, 2009. "The Consequences of Mortgage Credit Expansion: Evidence from the U.S. Mortgage Default Crisis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1449-1496.
    8. Chatterjee, Satyajit & Eyigungor, Burcu, 2009. "Foreclosures and house price dynamics: a quantitative analysis of the mortgage crisis and the foreclosure prevention policy," Working Papers 09-22, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
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