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New Evidence on Durable Goods Biased Technological Change


  • Susanto Basu
  • John Fernald


We describe new evidence that technological change is biased toward producing durables goods. Existing evidence in favor of the importance of change to growth and business cycles is based on the price deflators for investment and consumption goods. Our evidence is based on additional data, including industry specific goods prices, factor inputs, factor prices and the input-output tables.
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Suggested Citation

  • Susanto Basu & John Fernald, 2005. "New Evidence on Durable Goods Biased Technological Change," 2005 Meeting Papers 695, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed005:695

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Technological Change; Multisector Growth Models; Embodied technology;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence


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