IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/rdg/emxxdp/em-dp2007-42.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Weetman Pearson in Mexico and the Emergence of a British Oil Major, 1901-1919

Author

Listed:
  • Andrew Godley

    () (Department of Management, University of Reading)

  • Lisa Bud Frierman

    (Visiting research fellow at the Centre for International Business History, University of Reading)

  • Judith Wale

    (Visiting research fellow at the Centre for International Business History, University of Reading)

Abstract

British overseas investment was one of the most powerful forces contributing to rapid global integration before World War 1. Approaching half of this total was in the form of foreign direct investment, as British entrepreneurs increasingly located their activities away from the mature domestic economy to faster growing, less-developed regions. Weetman Pearson was one of the most successful of all Britain’s overseasbased entrepreneurs of the period. Using original financial records, the paper shows how the Pearson group of companies became one of Britain’s most valuable industrial enterprises by 1919 having diversified from international contracting into the Mexican oil industry from 1901. The Pearson group highlights how British entrepreneurs were technically competent in managing large, complex infrastructure projects, able to navigate their way through various political systems, and adept at turning to whichever organisational form best suited their business interests; characteristics far removed from the outdated stereotype of the incompetent Late Victorian entrepreneur

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Godley & Lisa Bud Frierman & Judith Wale, 2007. "Weetman Pearson in Mexico and the Emergence of a British Oil Major, 1901-1919," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2007-42, Henley Business School, Reading University.
  • Handle: RePEc:rdg:emxxdp:em-dp2007-42
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/nmsruntime/saveasdialog.asp?lID=10406&sID=34517
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Foreman-Peck, James & Hannah, Leslie, 2011. "Extreme Divorce: the Managerial Revolution in UK Companies before 1914," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2011/21, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rdg:emxxdp:em-dp2007-42. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Marie Pearson). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/bsrdguk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.