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Working Paper - WP/12/04- What price-level data can tell us about pricing conduct in South Africa


  • Dr. Kenneth Creamer
  • Dr. Greg Farrell
  • Prof. Neil Rankin


The study of pricing microdata is emerging in the literature as an important method for understanding actual pricing conduct. Studies of the large price datasets used to compile consumer price index (CPI) and producer price index (PPI) measures have been undertaken in a number of countries, including Israel (Baharad et al. 2004), Spain (Alvarez et al. 2004), France (Baudry et al. 2007), the United States (US) (Bils and Klenow 2005), Portugal (Dias et al. 2007), Germany (Stahl 2005), Luxemburg (Lunnemann 2005), Austria (Baumgartner et al. 2005), Sierra Leone (Kovanen 2006), Italy (Sabbatini et al. 2006), Denmark (Hansen et al. 2006), Brazil (Gouvea 2007), France (Gautier 2008), Finland (Kurri 2007), the euro area (Alvarez et al. 2008), Colombia (Julio and Zarate 2008) and Slovakia (Coricelli and Horvath 2010).

Suggested Citation

  • Dr. Kenneth Creamer & Dr. Greg Farrell & Prof. Neil Rankin, 2012. "Working Paper - WP/12/04- What price-level data can tell us about pricing conduct in South Africa," Papers 5117, South African Reserve Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:rbz:wpaper:5117

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    Cited by:

    1. Stan du Plessis & Ben Smit & Rudi Steinbach, 2014. "Working Paper – WP/14/04- A medium-sized open economy DSGE model of South Africa," Papers 6319, South African Reserve Bank.
    2. Franz Ruch & Neil Rankin & Stan du Plessis, 2016. "Working Paper – WP/16/06- Decomposing inflation using micro-price-level data- South Africa’s pricing dynamics," Papers 7353, South African Reserve Bank.

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